ASBO


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ASBO

A civil order made in the UK against a person (often a youth, who may “wear” his/her ASBO like a badge of honour) who has been shown on the balance of evidence to have engaged in anti-social behaviour in the UK or Ireland. Created by UK PM Tony Blair in 1998, ASBOs were meant to be imposed after minor incidents that would not ordinarily warrant prosecution, and to restrict behaviour in some fashion (e.g., by prohibiting a return to a certain area or shop, or restricting public swearing or drinking).
References in periodicals archive ?
North Wales Police, previously a significant user of the measure, issued just eight ASBOs last year.
"I know a lot of young people see them as a medal and take pride in their Asbos, but if they are enforced I think it does help keep the peace."
* GETTING SHIRTY: The Asbo as a badge of honour - and exploited commercially, too.
A Home Office spokesman said: "These latest figures confirm what we have already said; the current powers for tackling anti-social behaviour, particularly the Asbo, are too bureaucratic and don't work effectively.
Despite the fact gardai have slapped up to 4,000 warnings on thuggish kids and their parents, a measly six ASBOs have been enforced through the courts.
views at letters@co.uk, PO Box Street, L69 3EB "Scrapping Asbos and cutting police budgets would leave communities helpless and vulnerable.
"We are proud and we have praised him for it." Martin says the criminal ASBO was harshly imposed, but he, too, is pleased with the knock-on effect.
Under the terms of the ASBO, the teenager was prevented from entering an area bordered by Marner Road, Middlemarch Road, Barton Road and Gilfil Road.
The only exception is Cleveland, where 80 Asbos were handed out in 2006 compared with 60 the previous year.
Teenagers served with Asbos have even been named in the House of Commons as "asboids".
But Scotland's ASBO "league table" showed wide variations around the country.
We have got a situation where a third of these youths might not understand the terms and the conditions of the ASBO. The problem is that by the time they are teenagers it is difficult to get them to change their pattern of behaviour.'