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gray

 [gra]
the SI unit of absorbed radiation dose, defined as the transfer of 1 joule of energy per kilogram of absorbing material (1 J/kg); 1 gray equals 100 rads.

gray (Gy),

(grā),
The SI unit of absorbed dose of ionizing radiation, equivalent to 1 J/kg of tissue; 1 Gy = 100 rad.
Synonym(s): griseus
[Louis H. Gray, British radiologist, 1905-1965]
Radiation oncology noun The SI unit for radiation, based on actual radiation absorption, as measured by a thermoluminescent dosimeter placed within a patient or a phantom; 1 Gy is equal to 1 joule/kg of absorber, roughly equivalent to 100 rads
Vox populi adjective Referring to an older person, usually at or near the age of retirement

gray

Gy Radiation physics The SI unit for radiation, based on actual radiation absorption, as measured by a thermoluminescent dosimeter placed within a Pt or a phantom; 1 Gy is equal to 1 joule/kg of absorber–100 rads

gray

(grā)
The SI unit of absorbed dose of ionizing radiation, equivalent to 1 J/kg of tissue; 1 Gy = 100 rad.
[Louis H. Gray, British radiologist, 1905-1965]

gray

A unit of absorbed dose of radiation equal to an energy absorption of 1 Joule per kilogram of irradiated material. 1 Gy is equivalent to 100 RADS. In radiotherapy, radiation is commonly applied to the area of the tumour in a dosage of around 2 Gy a day, five days a week for periods of 3–6 weeks.

gray

(Gy) (grā)
The SI unit of absorbed dose of ionizing radiation, equivalent to 1 J/kg of tissue; 1 Gy = 100 rad.
[Louis H. Gray, British radiologist, 1905-1965]
References in periodicals archive ?
(12) Asa Gray, A Manual of the Botany of the Northern United States, (Boston and Cambridge: James Munroe and Company, 1848).That was the book through which Frost first heard about Charles Darwin's new ideas.
(14) Asa Gray, "Darwin and His Reviewers," Atlantic Monthly, 6 (October) 1860 : 406-425; Asa Gray, Darwiniana: Essays and Reviews Pertaining to Darwinism, edited by Asa Gray.
After the Origin of Species was published he entered into a revealing correspondence with Asa Gray in which the question of design in nature was explored in depth.
Darwin's most able defender in North America, Asa Gray, also commended the new theory from a Christian point of view.
Moreover, just as one can and must distinguish between various types of evolutionists -- materialists like Thomas Henry Huxley and theists like Asa Gray -- so one must also distinguish between various types of believers.
The familiar picture of modernists like Asa Gray, who could reconcile religion with evolution by conceiving of God as the Creator who set in motion the process of evolution, is contrasted with the less familiar portrait of men like Louis Agassiz who represented the "Scottish Common Sense philosophy." The latter philosophy held that because one cannot see evolution happening it must not be real.
Agassiz's position was challenged by his Harvard colleague, the botanist Asa Gray, who defended Darwinism as an enrichment of the concept of divine creation.
He is said to have discovered more new genera and species of plants in North America than any other single scientist, with the possible exception of Asa Gray. He returned to England in the middle 1840s.
1818); Mary Baker Eddy, <IR> SCIENCE AND HEALTH </IR> (1875); Asa Gray, Natural Science and Religion (1880); H.W.