arytenoid

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Related to Arytenoids: corniculate, larynx

arytenoid

 [ar″ĭ-te´noid]
shaped like a jug or pitcher, as the arytenoid cartilage or arytenoid muscle of the larynx.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ar·y·te·noid

(ar'i-tē'noyd), [TA] Avoid the mispronunciations a'rytenoid and aryt'enoid.
Denoting a cartilage (arytenoid cartilage) and muscles (oblique and transverse arytenoid muscles) of the larynx.
[see arytenoideus]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

arytenoid

(ăr′ĭ-tē′noid′, ə-rĭt′n-oid′)
n.
1. Either of two small pitcher-shaped cartilages at the back of the larynx to which the vocal cords are attached.
2. A muscle connected to either of these cartilages.
3. Any of several small mucous glands located in front of these cartilages.
adj.
Of or relating to these cartilages or an associated muscle or gland.

ar′y·te·noi′dal adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

arytenoid

adjective Ladle-shaped.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ar·y·te·noid

(ari-tēnoyd) [TA]
Denoting a cartilage (arytenoid cartilage) and muscles (oblique and transverse arytenoid muscles) of the larynx.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

arytenoid

Ladle-shaped. Pertaining to the two small cartilages attached to the vocal cords at the back of the LARYNX or to the arytenoid muscles of the larynx. From the Greek arutaina , a pitcher or ladle, and eidos , like.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

ar·y·te·noid

(ari-tēnoyd) [TA] Avoid the mispronunciations a'rytenoid and aryt'enoid.
Denoting a cartilage (arytenoid cartilage) and muscles (oblique and transverse arytenoid muscles) of the larynx.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The cricoid, thyroid and arytenoids are fully developed.
We present the case of a patient who was diagnosed with bilateral vocal fold immobility by in-office arytenoid palpation that required only topical anesthesia of the larynx.
(10) The arytenoids and the epiglottis are graded separately on a scale of 0 to 4 points, and the grades are added together.
Physical exploration and endoscopy detected a 4-cm tumor in the neoglottic area at the site of the left arytenoids. The patient underwent a total laryngectomy.
Closed reductions of arytenoid dislocations or minimally displaced fractures of the laryngeal skeleton, occasionally followed by endoscopically introduced stents, have been suggested as alternatives to open reductions.
This method allowed us to successfully perform intubation without being blocked by the arytenoids. The slight rightwards shifts of the trachea by the goitre did not increase the difficulty of intubation using the fiberoptic laryngoscope.
In contrast to total laryngectomy, in partial laryngectomy, the communication between the airways and the digestive tract remains, but the excision of some of the structures which serve to prevent the bolus passing into the trachea (epiglottis, arytenoids, or vocal cords) explains why in these patients the most common postoperative complication is aspiration.
CT scan of the neck showed extensive edema at the level of the arytenoids, but no retropharyngeal hematoma or abscess were noted (Figure 1).
Pain over the the thyroid cartilage thyroid cartilage Laryngoscopy Left true vocal fold Edema of right hematoma, left aryepiglottic fold and ventricular edema, normal both arytenoids, normal vocal fold movement glottis, normal vocal fold movement Computed Mildly displaced anterior Mildly displaced anterior tomography fracture, subcutaneous fracture, subcutaneous (CT) air air.
While further progression of procedure; opening of arytenoids was awaited prior to further advancement of scope into larynx and trachea.
It is necessary to know that the lips of the glottis can vibrate equally, either when the posterior extremities are put into contact (by the bringing together of the internal processes of the arytenoids), or when these extremities remain separated.