arytenoid

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Related to Arytenoid cartilages: thyroid cartilage, cricoid cartilage

arytenoid

 [ar″ĭ-te´noid]
shaped like a jug or pitcher, as the arytenoid cartilage or arytenoid muscle of the larynx.

ar·y·te·noid

(ar'i-tē'noyd), [TA] Avoid the mispronunciations a'rytenoid and aryt'enoid.
Denoting a cartilage (arytenoid cartilage) and muscles (oblique and transverse arytenoid muscles) of the larynx.
[see arytenoideus]

arytenoid

(ăr′ĭ-tē′noid′, ə-rĭt′n-oid′)
n.
1. Either of two small pitcher-shaped cartilages at the back of the larynx to which the vocal cords are attached.
2. A muscle connected to either of these cartilages.
3. Any of several small mucous glands located in front of these cartilages.
adj.
Of or relating to these cartilages or an associated muscle or gland.

ar′y·te·noi′dal adj.

arytenoid

adjective Ladle-shaped.

ar·y·te·noid

(ari-tēnoyd) [TA]
Denoting a cartilage (arytenoid cartilage) and muscles (oblique and transverse arytenoid muscles) of the larynx.

arytenoid

Ladle-shaped. Pertaining to the two small cartilages attached to the vocal cords at the back of the LARYNX or to the arytenoid muscles of the larynx. From the Greek arutaina , a pitcher or ladle, and eidos , like.

ar·y·te·noid

(ari-tēnoyd) [TA] Avoid the mispronunciations a'rytenoid and aryt'enoid.
Denoting a cartilage (arytenoid cartilage) and muscles (oblique and transverse arytenoid muscles) of the larynx.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is known that sparing both of the arytenoid cartilages is important for swallowing recovery.
SCPL is a surgical procedure in which the thyroid cartilage and true and false vocal folds are resected while preserving at least one arytenoid cartilage. There are two types of SCPL.
Joint ankylosis manifests as a loss of soft-tissue density between the cricoid and arytenoid cartilages (arrows) secondary to severe joint space narrowing, which creates areas of focal fusion.
A normal-appearing cricoarytenoid joint was defined as one with a clearly visible soft-tissue plane between the articular surface of the cricoid cartilage and the surface of the arytenoid cartilage on two or more orthogonal planes, with homogeneous density of the cartilage (figure 1).
A 5-0 Vicryl suture was used to reapproximate the vocal process to the exposed arytenoid cartilage along its medial surface.
(14) Similarly, Marcus et al reported using scissors to trim the obstructing mucosa from the lateral edge of the epiglottis, aryepiglottic folds, and arytenoid cartilage in all patients, even though they saw two distinct patterns of laryngomalacia in their patients; half exhibited anteromedial collapse of aryepiglottic folds and cuneiform cartilage, while the other half manifested only anteromedial collapse of the mucosa overlying the arytenoids.
Significant findings on examination included the presence of white lesions on the soft palate, erythema and edema of the arytenoid cartilages, and white lesions on the vocal folds (figure).
In addition to pulling the bodies of the arytenoid cartilages together, the IA seems to act as an accessory abductor, effecting a backward (and medial) sliding motion of the arytenoid.
The larynx is by no means responsible for song in birds, as the arytenoid cartilages are immobile and there are no vocal folds.