sugar substitute

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sugar substitute

Any of a group of carbohydrates (e.g., fructose, sorbitol and xylitol) which are of potential use as replacements for the usual dietary sugars—glucose and sucrose—in diabetics, as such substitutes do not require insulin for certain steps in their metabolism. However, the efficacy of sugar substitutes in reducing serum glucose is suboptimal, as the diabetic liver converts a significant portion of fructose and its metabolites into glucose.

sugar substitute

Nutrition Any of a group of carbohydrates–eg, fructose, sorbitol and xylitol, which are of potential use as replacements for the usual dietary sugars–glucose and sucrose in diabetics, as these molecules do not require insulin for certain steps in their metabolism; the efficacy of SSs in DM is less than optimal, since the diabetic liver converts a significant portion of fructose and its metabolites into glucose. See Artificial sweeteners, Aspartame, Cyclamates.
References in periodicals archive ?
Artificial Sweetner Comprehensive Study by Type (Aspartame, Acesulfame-K, Monosodium Glutamate, Saccharin, Sodium Benzoate), Application (Bakery Items, Dairy Products, Confectionery, Beverages) Players and Region - Global Market Outlook to 2024
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," she answered, "Have you considered your problem to be allergic reactions to artificial sweetners? H.J.
Goodman says he has used his model to devise sweeteners that taste more like sugar than today's best artificial sweetners. "But the kinds of molecules we make are, by and large, too expensive to be commercialized," he says.
Fodmap stands for fermentable oligosaccharides (eg wheats, pulses, rye, garlic and onions), disaccharides (eg milk and yogurt), monosaccharides (eg honey, apples, plums, peaches and mangoes) and polyols (artificial sweetners).
Moser about a column that appeared in your July/September issue pertaining to gastrointestinal reactions to "artificial sweetners" -- and in particular aspartame (NutraSweet[R]).
Finally, the suggestion that "artificial sweetners" might contribute to "bloating and diarrhea after drinking soda beverages" not only involves aspartame products but also soft drinks that contain sorbitol and mannitol.
Clear cupboards and fridge of all oils (except extra virgin olive), margarine, solid vegetable shortenings and products made with them, artificial sweetners and anything containing saccharin or aspartame, anything containing artificial colourings.
Banned foods for strict detoxers include caffeinated and decaffeinated drinks, dairy products, meat, fish, wheat bread, white rice, alcohol, cakes, fried food, artificial sweetners and ready meals.