sugar substitute

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sugar substitute

Any of a group of carbohydrates (e.g., fructose, sorbitol and xylitol) which are of potential use as replacements for the usual dietary sugars—glucose and sucrose—in diabetics, as such substitutes do not require insulin for certain steps in their metabolism. However, the efficacy of sugar substitutes in reducing serum glucose is suboptimal, as the diabetic liver converts a significant portion of fructose and its metabolites into glucose.

sugar substitute

Nutrition Any of a group of carbohydrates–eg, fructose, sorbitol and xylitol, which are of potential use as replacements for the usual dietary sugars–glucose and sucrose in diabetics, as these molecules do not require insulin for certain steps in their metabolism; the efficacy of SSs in DM is less than optimal, since the diabetic liver converts a significant portion of fructose and its metabolites into glucose. See Artificial sweeteners, Aspartame, Cyclamates.
References in periodicals archive ?
Billions of people worldwide consume artificial sweeteners and they are prescribed as a tool to treat obesity, despite little being known until now about their full impact on the brain and in regulating hunger.
I also truly believe as the public read more and more media stories about the safety of artificial sweeteners, they'll increasingly prefer to buy products made using natural sugar.
Erythritol can be sometimes used with added sweeteners, hence checking the label is mandatory to ensure it is not mixed with artificial sweeteners.A ItA should beA used in moderation with adding a little bit of stevia while on the keto diet.A
The "Artificial Sweeteners Market - Growth, Trend and Forecast (2019 - 2024)" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.
Artificial sweeteners once offered a solution, but their popularity has dwindled among concerns that they don't help with weight management and could even cause weight gain, metabolic syndrome and high blood pressure with continual use.
Unfortunately, switching to artificial sweeteners doesn't appear to be a clearly beneficial alternative.
A mounting obesity crisis in the United Kingdom (UK) and other developed nations has driven the proliferation of diet alternatives which use artificial sweeteners like aspartame, to replace more calorific sugar.
Your nervous system will also secrete hormones to stop your desire for more food, so by feeding it sweeteners you do not reach the point of saturation essential for wellbeing - you just want to continuously keep eating, in other words, long term, artificial sweeteners will contribute to you being overweight.
A new study comparing sugar and artificial sweeteners caused quite a buzz in late April of this year.
I hope I'm not the only one to find the recent news about artificial sweeteners more than just a little confusing.
About a third were concerned about electromagnetic frequencies, genetically modified food and artificial sweeteners.
How and why artificial sweeteners may have the same metabolic effects as the sugar they replace is not yet fully understood.