satellite

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satellite

 [sat´ĕ-līt]
1. in genetics, a knob of chromatin connected by a stalk to the short arm of certain chromosomes.
2. a minor, or attendant, lesion situated near a large one.
3. a vein that closely accompanies an artery.
4. exhibiting satellitism.
5. satellite clinic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sat·el·lite

(sat'ĕ-līt),
1. A minor structure accompanying a more important or larger one; for example, a vein accompanying an artery, or a small or secondary lesion adjacent to a larger one.
See also: primite.
2. The posterior member of a pair of gregarine gamonts in syzygy, several of which may be found in some species.
See also: primite.
[L. satelles (sattelit-), attendant]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

satellite

(săt′l-īt′)
n.
1. Genetics A short segment of a chromosome separated from the rest by a constriction, typically associated with the formation of a nucleolus.
2. Microbiology A colony of microorganisms whose growth in culture medium is enhanced by certain substances produced by another colony in its proximity.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Referring to one or more lesions, masses, patterns or radiologic densities that surround a central point and have the same pathogenesis and appearance
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

satellite

adjective Referring to lesions, masses, patterns or radiologic densities that surround a central point. See Minisatellite.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sat·el·lite

(sat'ĕ-līt)
1. A minor structure accompanying a more important or larger one, e.g., a vein accompanying an artery, or a small or secondary lesion adjacent to a larger one.
2. The posterior member of a pair of gregarine gamonts in syzygy, several of which may be found in some species.
[L. satelles (sattelit-), attendant]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
For the record and as a testimonial to his ability, I would like to mention his notable contributions to conventional astronomy since severing his connection with artificial satellite work, e.g.
Fear not, there is no evidence that artificial satellites have begun to interfere with the moon's influence on the tides.
Ions and electrons trapped on the lines of Earth's magnetic field have often affected the operations of artificial satellites orbiting the planet.
An increasing number of planetarium programs now include the ability to predict the visibility of artificial satellites, and TheSkyX is no exception.
Scientists keep a watchful eye on our planet's big cities and other areas with artificial satellites - spacecraft launched into Earth"s orbit.
If you are among their number, artificial satellites have always been in your sky, and it would not be surprising if you view the intervening years as "nearly a third of a century'--an only slightly time-stretching phrase for a span that is, after all, greater than your lifetime.
This really is an event worth celebrating when you consider how much artificial satellites and other space technologies have transformed our lives in the ensuing half century.
Frank, for example, notes that an "artificial comet' produced earlier this month by jettisoning a container of water and other materials from a NASA sounding rocket, was carefully timed to be visible to two artificial satellites: the Dynamics Explorer, whose data triggered the original controversy, and another known as Polar BEAR.
However, one possible source that the observers could notrule out was satellite glints, momentary reflections of sunlight by rotating artificial satellites. Two reports now attribute the observed Perseus flashes to such glints.