Arrhenius equation

(redirected from Arrhenius' law)
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Ar·rhe·ni·us e·qua·tion

(ă-rē'nē-ŭs),
an equation relating chemical reaction rate (k) to the absolute temperature (T) by the equation: d(ln k)/dT) = ΔEa/RT2 where Ea is the activation energy and R is the universal gas constant.
[Svante Arrhenius]

Arrhenius equation

(ă-rā′nē-us)
[Svante Arrhenius, Swedish chemist and Nobel laureate, 1859–1927]
A mathematical formula that specifies the influence of temperature on the rate of a chemical reaction. In general, a higher temperature produces a faster reaction. The equation is used in industry and pharmacy to predict shelf life of reagents and pharmaceuticals.

Arrhenius,

Svante, Swedish chemist and Nobel laureate, 1859-1927.
Arrhenius doctrine - the theory of electrolytic dissociation that became the basis of modern understanding of electrolytes. Synonym(s): Arrhenius law
Arrhenius equation - an equation relating chemical reaction rate to the absolute temperature.
Arrhenius law - Synonym(s): Arrhenius doctrine
Arrhenius-Madsen theory - that the reaction of an antigen with its antibody is a reversible reaction.
References in periodicals archive ?
The constitutive equation and its temperature dependency are represented by the Carreau model and Arrhenius' law.
The constitutive equation and its temperature dependency are assumed to be represented by the Carreau model and Arrhenius' law,