aromatase inhibitors


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Related to aromatase inhibitors: tamoxifen

ar·o·mat·ase in·hib·i·tors

drugs, such as aminoglutethimide, that inhibit aromatase, an enzyme in estrogen synthesis reactions.

aromatase inhibitors

A group of anti-cancer drugs that act by preventing the enzymatic conversion of androgens to oestrogens. These drugs are used especially in post-menopausal women with breast cancers that are being encouraged by oestrogens but that fail to respond to drugs such as tamoxifen. The third-generation aromatase inhibitors, developed in the early 1990s, which include anastrozole (Arimidex), letrozole (Femara) and exemestane (Aromasin), are now challenging tamoxifen as the treatment of choice in post-menopausal women with oestrogen-receptor-positive breast cancers.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, around 30 per cent of breast cancer patients taking aromatase inhibitors see their cancer eventually return.
The aromatase inhibitors are the new expansion in the hormonal treatment of breast cancer.
Successful detection of (anti-) androgenic and aromatase inhibitors in pre-spawning adult fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) using easily measured endpoints of sexual development.
Comparision of two aromatase inhibitors in women with Clomiphene resistant polycystic ovary syndrome.
Thirty-two percent of them used adjuvant tamoxifen only, 29% used an aromatase inhibitor only, 20% switched from adjuvant tamoxifen to an AI, and the rest used neither endocrine therapy.
[14.] Bhatnagar AS, Brodie AMH, Long BJ, Evans DB, Miller WR (2001) Intracellular aromatase and its relevance to the pharmacological efficacy of aromatase inhibitors. Journal of Steroid Biochemistry & Molecular Biology 76: 199-202.
She also notes that the risk reduction seen was not as much as seen with fellow aromatase inhibitor exemestane (Aromasin) in a previous study.
Therefore, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer can be treated by either blocking the ER with agents such as the selective ER modulator tamoxifen, or by reducing the production of oestrogens with aromatase inhibitors (AIs) [2].
Masculinization of gonads by aromatase inhibitors in a turtle with temperature-dependent sex determination.
Conclusions: Everolimus combined with an aromatase inhibitor improved progression-free survival in patients with hormone-receptor-positive advanced breast cancer previously treated with nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors.
Currently, aromatase inhibitors, leading to reduction of estradiol synthesis from testosterone, have been favoured in the treatment of breast cancer of postmenopausal women [1].