Arnold

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Ar·nold

(ar'nŏld),
Friedrich, German anatomist, 1803-1890. See: Arnold bundle, Arnold canal, Arnold ganglion, Arnold nerve, Arnold tract, foramen of Arnold.

Ar·nold

(ar'nŏld),
References in periodicals archive ?
"Instead of being bounced round the system, due to pressure for beds, the Lee Arnolds of this world would get treatment and our communities would be so much safer.
Birkdale student William Lound was knifed 11 times by out-of-control and crazed Lee Arnold, who targeted and attacked the 30-year-old at his university Halls of Residence, in Salford, in February, 2016.
There are no new monographs on Arnold to discuss this year, but a variety of substantial new articles and book chapters deal with his life, career, and individual works in interesting ways.
Nevertheless, Arnold's critical approach has been controversial through the years.
In 1995, Clinton spent the night at Arnold's home in California, and just last year the Arnolds were guests at a state dinner for french President Jacques Chirac, hosted by the Clintons.
For Texarkana's Truman Arnold Cos., it's also the mother of profit.
The spring of 1889 found the Arnolds busy in anticipation.
Familial bonds were strengthened with the birth of their son Roger in 1890, and Armine and Nelly frequently stayed with both the Kemberleys and the Arnolds. (14) Upon Lady Kimberley's death in 1895, Frances Arnold wrote to Lord Kimberley of "the debt of gratitude I owed her for all she has been to Nelly, and I feel how much Nelly will miss her excellent judgement, and most true and affectionate kindness." (15) Nelly too was clearly liked by the Kimberleys.
In "Matthew Arnold's 'Rugby Chapel' and Thomas Arnold's Travel Journals" (ELN 40 no.
It was refreshing to see a study of Arnold's much maligned poem Sohrab and Rustum that makes new claims for its importance.
In most accounts of Arnold's polemics in Victorian debates about literature and science, the emphasis has fallen on his arguments with T.H.
Many others of course could say as much, but Saintsbury, as he showed by his various commentaries on Arnold in, for instance, Corrected Impressions (1895), A History of Nineteenth Century Literature (1896), A Short History of English Literature (1898), Matthew Arnold (1899), A History of English Criticism (1911), and A Last Scrapbook (1924) clearly intended to provide the definitive account of the figure who loomed more importantly than any other in the minds of late Victorian literary critics.