Armillifer

Armillifer

(ar-mil'i-fer),
A genus of Pentastomida (order Porocephalida, family Porocephalidae); adults of these wormlike parasites are found in the lungs of reptiles and the young in many mammals, including humans.
[O. Fr. armille, fr. L. armilla, a bracelet]

Armillifer

(ar″mil′ĭ-fĕr) [L. armillifer, bracelet-wearing]
A genus of bloodsucking, endoparasitic arthropods. The natural hosts are reptiles; humans are accidental hosts.

Armillifer moniliformis

A species whose larvae are parasitic in human beings in the Philippines and China.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because the structures were suspected to be pentastomes, they were compared with reference material from the Institute of Tropical Medicine Educational Department (Figure, panel B) and confirmed as Armillifer spp.
The number of reported cases of human pentastomiasis from Africa is increasing (6,8); because infection with Armillifer parasites is usually asymptomatic, we assume that the incidence of this infection is underestimated.
The pentastomes of reptiles have zoonotic potential, but among these parasites only Armillifer, Raillietiella, and Porocephalus have been associated with human infections (Riley, 1986; Qiu et al., 2005; Meyers and Neafie, 2011).
La linguatulosis o pentastomiosis es una zoonosis parasitaria causada por dos especies parasitarias: Linguatula serrata y Armillifer armillatus (Acha y Szyfres, 2003).
Two families, Linguatulidae and Porocephalidae of which two important genera Linguatula and Armillifer, respectively, have been known to be of importance in veterinary and human medicine [3].
Other pentastomids (Armillifer sp.) have been reported in royal pythons [11] in the south western part of the country.
Linguatula serrata and Armillifer armillatus were associated with 99% of the reported cases of human pentastomiasis (Drabick, 1987; Pare, 2008).
Armillifer parasites occupy the tracheae and bronchi of African rock pythons, puff adders and Mozambiquan spitting cobras.
Adult Armillifer pentastomids inhabit the respiratory tract of large snakes (final hosts), where they sexually reproduce, resulting in shedding of infective ova into the environment by snake feces or respiratory secretions (5,6).
Most human infections with these parasites are caused by Armillifer armillatus (2), a parasite endemic to western and central Africa.
serrata and Armillifer armillatus are responsible for most human cases of infection.
Most documented human infections are caused by members of the species Armillifer armillatus, which cause visceral pentastomiasis in West and Central Africa (2-4).