keratic precipitates

(redirected from Arlt's triangle)

ke·rat·ic pre·cip·i·tates (KP),

inflammatory cells on the corneal endothelium.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ke·rat·ic pre·cip·i·tates

(ker-at'ik prĕ-sip'i-tăts)
Inflammatory cells on the corneal endothelium.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

keratic precipitates (KP)

Cells (e.g. leukocytes) deposited on the endothelium of the cornea which occur as a result of inflammation of the iris or the ciliary body. They often collect in a triangular pattern with the base down (Arlt's triangle) on the inferior portion of the endothelial surface. They may also be distributed diffusely over the endothelium, as in Fuchs' heterochromic iridocyclitis or anterior uveitis, or concentrated in one area, as in disciform keratitis or herpes simplex keratitis. In granulomatous uveitis they are larger than in nongranulomatous uveitis, greasy in appearance (called 'mutton fat'). Following treatment of the primary cause they usually disappear. See cornea guttata.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann
References in periodicals archive ?
A prominent vascularized iris lesion located at 7 o'clock was present in the right eye in addition to mutton-fat keratic precipitates, predominantly in Arlt's triangle, anterior chamber cells, and mixed conjunctival and ciliary injection (Figure 1(a)).