organon

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Related to Aristotelian logic: Term logic

organ

 [or´gan]
accessory digestive o's (accessory o's of digestive system) organs and structures not part of the alimentary canal that aid in digestion; they include the teeth, salivary glands, liver, gallbladder, and pancreas.
organ of Corti the organ lying against the basilar membrane in the cochlear duct, containing special sensory receptors for hearing, and consisting of neuroepithelial hair cells and several types of supporting cells.
effector organ a muscle or gland that contracts or secretes, respectively, in direct response to nerve impulses.
enamel organ a process of epithelium forming a cap over a dental papilla and developing into the enamel.
end organ end-organ.
Golgi tendon organ any of the mechanoreceptors arranged in series with muscle in the tendons of mammalian muscles, being the receptor for stimuli responsible for the lengthening reaction.
sense o's (sensory o's) organs that receive stimuli that give rise to sensations, i.e., organs that translate certain forms of energy into nerve impulses that are perceived as special sensations.
spiral organ organ of Corti.
target organ the organ affected by a particular hormone.
vestigial organ an undeveloped organ that, in the embryo or in some remote ancestor, was well developed and functional.
o's of Zuckerkandl para-aortic bodies.

or·gan

(ōr'găn), [TA]
Any part of the body exercising a specific function (for example, respiration, secretion, or digestion).
Synonym(s): organum [TA], organon
[L. organum, fr. G. organon, a tool, instrument]

organon

See organ.

or·gan

(ōr'găn) [TA]
A differentiated structure or part of a system of the body; composed of tissues and cells; exercises a specific function (e.g., respiration, secretion, digestion).
Synonym(s): organum [TA] , organon.
[L. organum, fr. G. organon, a tool, instrument]

or·gan

(ōr'găn) [TA]
A differentiated structure or part of a system of the body; composed of tissues and cells.
Synonym(s): organum [TA] , organon.
[L. organum, fr. G. organon, a tool, instrument]

organon

pl. organa [Gr.] organ.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reality principle and the stability of the representations investment, based the Aristotelian logic because the stable investment of representations ensure the stability of the identity of objects.
Traditional or Aristotelian logic is a philosophical practice that uses the concept of the categorical syllogism as a foundation.
Ramus reserved his most penetrating criticism, however, for Aristotelian logic, a stance that earned him wrath in every intellectual quarter of Europe.
The Aristotelian logic of metaphor, in which a metaphor properly resembles the essence of a prelinguistic and determining referent, is compatible with--in fact, constitutive of--the logics of the transcendental Self and instrumental writing.
His famous Sic et non organized authoritative texts to emphasize their opposition, and his theological works attempted to resolve the contradictions according to Aristotelian logic.
Using the skepticism developed in the ancient Greek texts of Sextus Empiricus, together with the modern skeptical efforts of Montaigne, Charron, and Sanches, Gassendi first sought to show the artificiality of Aristotelian logic and its worthlessness as a means of discovering truths.
This stance posits our knowledge of objective reality as remaining incomplete and holds "that a multivalued logic - one that maps the suspension of the law of the excluded middle - might encode reality more accurately than traditional Aristotelian logic does" (p.
Precisely because it seeks to nurture continuing explorations by multiple communities of investigators into different sectors of experience, a generalized agnosticism remains open to the prospect that multi-valued logics which create space for more possibilities than just A and not-A may eventually overshadow the two-place Aristotelian logic as a more accurate encoding of the structure of reality.
Through, out our lives, we have used this "crisp" or Western Aristotelian logic.
But if poetry is at odds with logical thought, how are we to explain the application of Aristotelian logic to aesthetics, an application that resulted in the development of the poetic syllogism?