Argyrol


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mild sil·ver pro·tein

a complex prepared by the reaction of silver oxide with either gelatin or serum albumin. Black shiny crystals liberate silver and it was formerly widely used as a topical anti-infective on mucous membranes. Contains 19-25% silver, only a small fraction of which is ionizable. Can produce black or brown pigmentation due to deposition of reduced silver in the tissues.
Synonym(s): argyrol, silvol

Argyrol

(är′jə-rôl′, -rōl′)
A trademark for a silver-protein compound used as a local antiseptic.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Argyrol became so popular that it was also used for infections at numerous other sites ranging from the nose and throat, through the rectum and genitourinary tract, to the skin where it was additionally recommended for other noninfectious conditions such as psoriasis.
Barnes allegedly instructed his secretary that Jastrow's "sense of the ethical significance of English seems to be defective--so write her in Yiddish" (William Schack, Art and Argyrol: The Life and Career of Dr.
The organisation is, however, surely being coy in describing Argyrol, an antiseptic compound from which its founder derived his immense fortune, as being used 'in the prevention of infant blindness' when the drug's primary purpose was to treat gonorrhoea.
Barnes and German scientist, Hermann Hille, developed the pharmaceutical product Argyrol.(24) Through the sale of Argyrol, Barnes quickly became a wealthy man.(25) With his financial status secure, Barnes devoted most of his time to his passion--art.(26) Because Barnes believed that he was not much of an artist, he collected the works of others.
Barnes's education in medicine, his career in chemistry, and the fortune he made through the sale of the drug, Argyrol, which Barnes invented along with fellow scientist Hermann Hille).