arginine

(redirected from Arginine metabolism)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

arginine

 (Arg) (R) [ahr´jĭ-nēn]
a nonessential amino acid that occurs in proteins and is involved in the urea cycle and in the synthesis of creatine. Preparations of the base or the glutamate or hydrochloride salt are used in the treatment of hyperammonemia and in the assessment of pituitary function.

ar·gi·nine (Arg),

(ar'ji-nēn),
An amino acid occurring among the hydrolysis products of proteins, particularly abundant in the basic proteins such as histones and protamines. A dibasic amino acid.

arginine

(är′jə-nēn′)
n.
An amino acid, C6H14N4O2, obtained from the hydrolysis or digestion of plant and animal protein.

arginine

Biochemistry
A facultatively essential amino acid that contains a guanido group with a pKa > 12, which carries a positive charge at physiological pH; it becomes an essential amino acid when the body is under stress or injured.

Sources
Food—turkey, chicken and other meats.
 
Fringe medicine
An amino acid believed to decrease cancer risk, and given as a nutritional supplement; arginine stimulates sperm motility.

arginine

Biochemistry A 'facultatively' essential amino acid that contains a guanido group with a pKa > 12, which carries a positive charge at physiological pH; it becomes an essential amino acid when the body is under stress or injured Sources Turkey, chicken and other meats. See Unproven methods for cancer management.

ar·gi·nine

(ahr'ji-nēn)
One of the amino acids occurring among the hydrolysis products of proteins, particularly abundant in the basic proteins such as histones and protamines. A dibasic amino acid.
Arginineclick for a larger image
Fig. 46 Arginine . Molecular structure.

arginine (R, Arg)

one of 20 AMINO ACIDS common in proteins. It has an extra basic group, and is alkaline in solution. The ISOELECTRIC POINT of arginine is 10.8. See Fig. 46 .

ar·gi·nine

(ahr'ji-nēn)
An amino acid occurring among the hydrolysis products of proteins, particularly abundant in the basic proteins.
References in periodicals archive ?
We first developed an assay to measure arginine metabolism in mouse plasma and serum, and subsequently transitioned the assay to human plasma for clinical studies.
To determine whether arginine metabolism is altered in systemic inflammatory states, we measured arginine and metabolites in the plasma of mice with and without a peripheral injection of a proinflammatory stimulus (i.e., LPS).
We then determined whether inflammation in humans was also associated with changes in arginine metabolism. Arginine and metabolite concentrations were determined in 59 human plasma samples divided into 2 groups on the basis of high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) concentration: a normal group with concentrations ranging from 0 to 10 mg/L hsCRP, the upper limit of reference range for the assay, and an increased group with concentrations >10 mg/L hsCRP.
In vivo whole body and organ arginine metabolism during endotoxemia (sepsis) is dependent on mouse strain and gender J.
The present study was therefore designed to further investigate how brain arginine metabolism was affected by age and to elucidate how the long-term supplementation of TRF affected brain arginine metabolism in both young and aged rats.
Liu, "Ageing alters behavioural function and brain arginine metabolism in male Sprague-Dawley rats," Neuroscience, vol.
Morris, "Arginine metabolism: nitric oxide and beyond," Biochemical Journal, vol.
In summary, our results support previous work that systemic and organ-specific arginine metabolism by arginase and NOS can be measured in the mouse using multitracerstable isotope methods.
Ball, "A multitracer stable isotope quantification of the effects of arginine intake on whole body arginine metabolism in neonatal piglets," The American Journal of Physiology--Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol.
Poljakovic et al., "Dysregulated arginine metabolism, hemolysis-associated pulmonary hypertension, and mortality in sickle cell disease," Journal of the American Medical Association, vol.