archetype

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archetype

 [ar´kĕ-tīp]
in jungian psychology, a structural component of the collective unconcious, which is an inherited idea derived from the life experience of all of the members of the race and contained in the individual unconscious. The archetypes are the ideas, modes of thought, and patterns of reaction that are typical of all humanity and represent the wisdom of the ages. They appear in personified or symbolized form in dreams and visions and in mythology, legends, religion, fairy tales, and art. See also jung.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ar·che·type

(ar'kĕ-tīp),
1. A primitive structural plan from which various modifications have evolved.
2. In jungian psychology, the structural unit of the collective unconscious each of which is available to all. Synonym(s): imago (2)
[G. archetypos, pattern, model, fr. archē, beginning, + typtō, to stamp out]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

archetype

(är′kĭ-tīp′)
n.
In Jungian psychology, an inherited pattern of thought or symbolic imagery derived from past collective experience and present in the individual unconscious.

ar′che·typ′al (-tī′pəl), ar′che·typ′ic (-tĭp′ĭk), ar′che·typ′i·cal adj.
ar′che·typ′i·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ar·che·type

(ahr'kĕ-tīp)
1. A primordial structural plan from which various modifications have evolved.
2. psychology C.G. Jung's term for structural manifestation of the collective unconscious.
Synonym(s): imago (2) .
[G. archetypos, pattern, model, fr. archē, beginning, + typtō, to stamp out]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

archetype

the hypothetical ancestral type from which other forms are thought to be derived; it usually lacks specialized characteristics.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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An archtype building is better adapted to personal use, and floor space will not be at a premium.
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