buoyancy

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buoyancy

(1) The degree to which a body floats in a liquid.
(2) The force exerted by a fluid on a floating body, which opposes the force of gravity and is equal to the  body’s density.
References in periodicals archive ?
This emphasis on defining terms like mass, density, pressure and volume before learning Archimedes' principle is not restricted to fourth to seventh graders alone.
3) between the volume of the stones measured by using Archimedes' principle and that determined with PHM.
Galileo was clearly keeping the scaling theory a secret for the eventuality of a situation like this one, and his new view of Archimedes' principle was completely beyond the abilities of his opponents to answer.
This important discovery later became known as Archimedes' Principle.
To demonstrate Archimedes' principle - ``The buoyant force on an object is equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object'' - his class builds aluminum foil boats, sinks them with marbles, and figures out displacement of the water by the weight of the marbles.