Archaea

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Archaea

Evolutionary biology
One of the three domains of living organisms: Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota. While Archaea are single-celled, they are unlike bacteria given their independent evolutionary history. Archaea differ from Eukaryota in their ribosomal structure and the presence—in some—of introns in the genome, as well as other features (e.g., different membrane composition).
 
Molecular biology
Archaea are of interest in biotechnology as they have unique biochemical features (e.g., enzymes of theromophiles, such as Taq polymerase, the “workhorse” enzyme of PCR) and are extremely stable at high temperatures. Archaea include metabolic oddities (e.g., extreme halophiles, which live in extremely salty environments), methanogens (which produce methane) and sulphur-dependant extreme thermophiles (which can live in extremely hot environments).

Archaea phyla
• Crenarchaeota
• Euryarchaeota
• Korarchaeota
• Nanoarchaeota
• Thaumarchaeota (recently proposed)

Archaea

( formerly
References in periodicals archive ?
A recent study showed a novel archea primase noncatalytic subunit, denoted PriX, from Sulfolobus solfataricus.
119720203 Archea Bold font indicates the experimentally characterized beta-N-acetylhexosaminidases.
Blanc PD, Eisner MD, Katz PP, Yen IH, Archea C, Earnest G, et al.
Reduced rumen methanogenesis could be linked to the role of sheanut tannins in reducing protozoa and/or methanogenic archea population (Bhatta et al., 2009).
Scientists say they suspect the Antarctic waters are supersaturated with oxygen and other gases and may be home to bacteria and single-celled microorganisms called archea.
These bacteria are metabolically more versatile than the archea and their enzymatic activity is more diverse [2,21].
In 1995, this program was used to find genes in the first completely sequenced genomes of bacteria and archea.
Proteases from different pathogenic organism like protozoa, fungi and archea were selected for predicting their 3-D structures.
Chapter 13 in Archea, Molecular and Cellular Biology, R.
The reference being made here is to the planetary superorganism termed Gaia by Lovelock.20[20] As Lovelock has argued with great persuasion, it is only because of bacterial activity on a planetary scale that conditions hospitable to life have been preserved for and beyond the 3 billion years in which only bacteria and archea (another group of single-celled organisms) were the only living organisms on the planet.
Oxygen became from the vantage point of hyperthermophilic Archaea, microorganisms that grow at temperatures of 90[degrees]C and above and considered to be the most ancient of all extant life forms, the first great atmospheric "pollutant." Deep-sea communities comprised by members of Archea had to resort to terrestrial instead of solar energy with reduced sulfur compounds becoming the major electron donors for aerobic microbial metabolism, thus evading the corrosive effects of the newly generated "pollutant."