Archaea

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Archaea

Evolutionary biology
One of the three domains of living organisms: Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota. While Archaea are single-celled, they are unlike bacteria given their independent evolutionary history. Archaea differ from Eukaryota in their ribosomal structure and the presence—in some—of introns in the genome, as well as other features (e.g., different membrane composition).
 
Molecular biology
Archaea are of interest in biotechnology as they have unique biochemical features (e.g., enzymes of theromophiles, such as Taq polymerase, the “workhorse” enzyme of PCR) and are extremely stable at high temperatures. Archaea include metabolic oddities (e.g., extreme halophiles, which live in extremely salty environments), methanogens (which produce methane) and sulphur-dependant extreme thermophiles (which can live in extremely hot environments).

Archaea phyla
• Crenarchaeota
• Euryarchaeota
• Korarchaeota
• Nanoarchaeota
• Thaumarchaeota (recently proposed)

Archaea

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References in periodicals archive ?
Future research on Rice Cluster I archaeans, Reeburgh says, may reveal practical ways to interfere with a paddy's methane production.
The origins of gram-negative bacteria and methane-producing archaeans are placed a billion or more years later than indicated by paleobiology.
If I understood you, the carbon isotopic data seem to be suggesting that archaeans, photosynthetic bacteria, and I think probably cyanobacteria, were present all the way back to 3.5 billion years ago.