Arcanobacterium


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Arcanobacterium

(ar-kā'nō-bac-tēr'ē-um),
A genus of nonmotile, facultatively anaerobic bacteria containing gram-positive slender irregular rods, sometimes showing clubbed ends that may be in "V" formation with no filaments. These microorganisms are obligate parasites of the pharynx in farm animals and humans. AArcanobacterium haemolyticum occasionally causes lesions of the pharynx or skin.

Arcanobacterium

/Ar·ca·no·bac·te·ri·um/ (ahr-ka″no-bak-tēr´e-um) a genus of irregular, rod-shaped, non–spore-forming, gram-positive bacteria. A. haemoly´ticus causes human infection that is manifested in adolescents as pharyngitis and a scarlatiniform rash similar to those of streptococcal infection.

Ar·can·o·bac·te·ri·um

(ahr-kā'nō-bak-tēr'ē-ŭm)
A genus of nonmotile, facultatively anaerobic bacteria containing gram-positive slender irregular rods, sometimes showing clubbed ends. These organisms are obligate parasites of the pharynx in farm animals and humans, occasionally causing lesions on the pharynx or skin. The type species is A. haemolyticum.

Arcanobacterium

a genus of pleomorphic gram-positive actinomycete bacteria previously grouped in the genus Corynebacterium.

Arcanobacterium hippocoleae
isolated from vaginitis in horses.
Arcanobacterium phocae
isolated from a variety of body systems in seals, but the pathogenic significance is uncertain.
Arcanobacterium pluranimalium
isolated from lung abscesses in deer and liver abscesses, mastitis, endometritis, abortions and endocarditis in cattle.
Arcanobacterium pyogenes
capable of producing suppurative lesions in any organ or tissue in animals. In farm animals, especially ruminants, it is the most common bacteria found in infected wounds and abscesses. An important cause of mastitis in cattle. Previously called Actinomyces pyogenes and Corynebacterium pyogenes.
References in periodicals archive ?
The microbial growing is suspected, by inconspicuous hemolytic zones at 24 hours (h) of incubation at 37[degrees]C on bovine blood agar, thereafter at 48 h and with an exhaustive macroscopic examination, it is possible to see white pin point colonies with 1-2 mm diameter, surrounded by a more prominent total ([beta]) hemolysis [9, 46, 57], it is partially acid-alcohol resistant and has a fermentative metabolism [35]; unlike clinical samples, cultures do not have a characteristic odor; CAMP test is helpful to confirm the identification [13,31] and differentiation from Arcanobacterium haemolyticum, which inhibit Staphylococcus aureus [beta] haemolysin [47].
For example, pharyngitis caused by Arcanobacterium haemolyticum can have a similar clinical syndrome as group A strep, including fever, exudative pharyngitis, and accompanying rash.
Antimicrobial resistance and presence of virulence factor genes in Arcanobacterium pyogenes isolated from the uterus of postpartum dairy cows.
Other causes include Mycoplasma, Epstein-Barr virus, Adenovirus, Influenza virus, Arcanobacterium haemolyticum, gonococcal pharyngitis and others.
Antibiotic sensitivity and biochemical characterization of Fusobacterium spp and Arcanobacterium pyogenes isolated from farmed white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) with necrobacillosis.
Corynebacterium sp and Arcanobacterium sp are frequently isolated from ears of affected animals.
5,10,18) There are case reports in which Arcanobacterium (Corynebacterium) haemolyticum (from the Actinomyces pyogenes family) grew in culture.
Association between virulence factors of Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium necrophorum, and Arcanobacterium pyogenes and uterine diseases of dairy cows.
Recently, based on phenotypic and molecular techniques the former Arcanobacterium pyogenes was reclassified as Trueperella pyogenes (YASSIN et al.
5,11] The predominance of diptheroids reflects the normal flora of the oral cavity, as does isolation of viridans streptococci and Arcanobacterium haemolyticum.
Mancini reviewed common exanthems, and many that aren't so common, paying special attention to five of the newer or atypical exanthems: acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP), Arcanobacterium haemolyticum, Gianotti-Crosti syndrome, papular-purPuric gloves and socks syndrome, and unilateral laterothoracic exanthem.
Rhodococcus equi and Arcanobacterium haemolyticum: Two "Coryneform" Bacteria Increasingly Recognized as Agents of Human Infection.