arachidonic acid

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Related to Arachidonic acids: Carboxylic acids, Essential fatty acids, Linoleic acids

arachidonic acid

 [ah-rak″ĭ-don´ik]
an essential fatty acid that cannot be synthesized by animal tissues and must be obtained in the diet.

ar·a·chi·don·ic ac·id

(ă-rak-i-don'ik as'id),
An unsaturated fatty acid, usually essential in nutrition; the biologic precursor of the prostaglandins, the thromboxanes, and the leukotrienes (collectively known as eicosanoids).

arachidonic acid

/arach·i·don·ic acid/ (ah-rak″ĭ-don´ik) a polyunsaturated 20-carbon essential fatty acid occurring in animal fats and formed by biosynthesis from linoleic acid; it is a precursor to leukotrienes, prostaglandins, and thromboxane.

arachidonic acid

(ăr′ə-kĭ-dŏn′ĭk)
n.
An unsaturated fatty acid, C20H32O2, present in animal fats and synthesized by the body from linoleic acid, that is essential in human nutrition and is a precursor in the biosynthesis of some prostaglandins.

arachidonic acid

[ar′əkidon′ik]
Etymology: L, arachos, a legume
a long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid that is a component of lecithin and serves as a starting material in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins and leukotrienes. In mammals, arachidonic acid is synthesized from linoleic acid.

arachidonic acid

Biochemistry
A polyunsaturated omega-6 fatty acid, which is an essential dietary component for mammals and the precursor for biosynthesis of prostaglandins, thromboxanes and hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid derivatives (e.g., leukotrienes). Arachidonic acid release from phospholipids is the limiting step in forming its active metabolites.

Nutrition
Foods containing arachidonic acid—e.g., egg yolks, fatty red meat and organ meats—are viewed as unhealthy by nutritionists.

ar·a·chi·don·ic ac·id

(ar'ă-ki-don'ik as'id)
Liquid unsaturated fatty acid that occurs in most animal fats; considered essential in animal nutrition.

arachidonic acid

An unsaturated fatty acid, formed from LINOLENIC acid, and a precursor of prostaglandins and thomboxanes.

arachidonic acid

cell membrane constituent which undergoes degradation during inflammation to form prostaglandins and cytokines, with resultant increase in the inflammatory response; arachidonic acid breakdown is disrupted by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, aspirin and steroids (see aspirin; non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; steroids)

ar·a·chi·don·ic ac·id

(ar'ă-ki-don'ik as'id)
An unsaturated fatty acid, usually essential in nutrition; the biologic precursor of the prostaglandins, the thromboxanes, and the leukotrienes (collectively known as eicosanoids).

arachidonic acid (ar´əkədon´ik),

n an essential fatty acid that is a com-ponent of lecithin and a basic material for the biosynthesis of some prostaglandins.
Arachnia propionica,
n an opportunistic, naturally occurring organism in the body, especially in body cavities and on the skin. It is sometimes implicated in actinomycosis, especially in open wounds.

arachidonic acid

twenty carbon fatty acid containing four double bonds of the n-6 family essential fatty acids from which prostaglandins, thromboxane and leukotrienes are derived. Deficiency, which is characterized by hair loss, fatty liver degeneration, anemia and reduced fertility, occurs most commonly in cats because of their inability to synthesize arachidonic acid from linoleic acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mediation of arachidonic acid metabolite(s) produced by endothelial cytochrome P-450 3A4 in monkey arterial relaxation.
Cytochrome P450-dependent arachidonic acid metabolites, 19- and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids, enhance sodium-potassium ATPase activity in vascular smooth muscle.
Cytochrome P450 pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism.
Regulation and inhibition of arachidonic acid omega-hydroxylases and 20-HETE formation.
Abnormal pressure-natriuresis in hypertension: role of cytochrome P450 metabolites of arachidonic acid.
P-450 metabolites of arachidonic acid in the control of cardiovascular function.
2] were the major metabolites of arachidonic acid studied among the three Allium species.
Since, as far as is known, indomethacin is not an inhibitor of lipoxygenase, it is highly possible that cyclo-oxygenase was involved in the above-mentioned conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins and a thromboxane.
2] in corn leaf homogenates that were incubated with 3H-labeled arachidonic acid.
The compounds are arachidonic acid derivatives, and inherent in these seaweed natural-product structures is evidence of a highly evolved lipoxygenase-type metabolism that matches or exceeds the complexity of comparable metabolic routes in mammalian systems.
Labeled arachidonic acid applied to an extract of the alga produced a pheromone, dictyotene.
By imposing nitrogen starvation, it was possible to obtain a lipid mixture that may be separated in arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid-rich fractions.