arachidonic acid

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Related to Arachidonic acids: Carboxylic acids, Essential fatty acids, Linoleic acids

arachidonic acid

 [ah-rak″ĭ-don´ik]
an essential fatty acid that cannot be synthesized by animal tissues and must be obtained in the diet.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ar·a·chi·don·ic ac·id

(ă-rak-i-don'ik as'id),
An unsaturated fatty acid, usually essential in nutrition; the biologic precursor of the prostaglandins, the thromboxanes, and the leukotrienes (collectively known as eicosanoids).
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

arachidonic acid

(ăr′ə-kĭ-dŏn′ĭk)
n.
An unsaturated fatty acid, C20H32O2, present in animal fats and synthesized by the body from linoleic acid, that is essential in human nutrition and is a precursor in the biosynthesis of some prostaglandins.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

arachidonic acid

Biochemistry
A polyunsaturated omega-6 fatty acid, which is an essential dietary component for mammals and the precursor for biosynthesis of prostaglandins, thromboxanes and hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid derivatives (e.g., leukotrienes). Arachidonic acid release from phospholipids is the limiting step in forming its active metabolites.

Nutrition
Foods containing arachidonic acid—e.g., egg yolks, fatty red meat and organ meats—are viewed as unhealthy by nutritionists.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ar·a·chi·don·ic ac·id

(ar'ă-ki-don'ik as'id)
Liquid unsaturated fatty acid that occurs in most animal fats; considered essential in animal nutrition.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

arachidonic acid

An unsaturated fatty acid, formed from LINOLENIC acid, and a precursor of prostaglandins and thomboxanes.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

ar·a·chi·don·ic ac·id

(ar'ă-ki-don'ik as'id)
An unsaturated fatty acid, usually essential in nutrition; the biologic precursor of the prostaglandins, the thromboxanes, and the leukotrienes (collectively known as eicosanoids).
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The primary endpoint was PAR induced by arachidonic acid at discharge, and the secondary endpoint was the rate of thrombotic events including brain infarction and myocardial infarction during follow-up.
[sup][21] Similar to the findings in vascular smooth muscle cells and aortic fibroblasts, [sup][22] we found that Ang II up-regulates the expression of COX-2 in human endothelial cells, which subsequently catalyzes arachidonic acid into prostaglandin and leads to an increased level of TXA [sub]2 .
The most sensitive fatty acids for peroxidation were arachidonic acid, C20:4 n-6 and docosahexanoic acid, C22:6 n-3.
Analysis of fatty acids by gas chromatography showed that heavy density chromatin fractions are enriched with C20:4 n-6 arachidonic acid, when compared with low density chromatin fractions.
The peroxidation affected principally arachidonic acid and its diminution was more evident in the control microsomes than in the microsomes from the vitamin E-treated group.
Mediation of arachidonic acid metabolite(s) produced by endothelial cytochrome P-450 3A4 in monkey arterial relaxation.
Cytochrome P450-dependent arachidonic acid metabolites, 19- and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids, enhance sodium-potassium ATPase activity in vascular smooth muscle.
The arachidonic acid products 15-HpETE, 12-HETE, and 5-HETE were detectable by 60 min of oxidation.
(1978), for instance, extracted from soybean an enzyme (lipoxygenase-2) that catalyzed the formation of [PGF.sub.2[Alpha]] from arachidonic acid. Ali et al.
Since, as far as is known, indomethacin is not an inhibitor of lipoxygenase, it is highly possible that cyclo-oxygenase was involved in the above-mentioned conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins and a thromboxane.
Arginine 120 (Arg-120) just below Ser-530 in the active sites of COX, however, makes the difference of arachidonic acid binding ability between COX-1 and COX-2 isoenzymes (Figure 2).
Hereby, it has to be emphasized that in all cases arachidonic acid is first transformed to unstable precursor intermediate molecules ending up to many "S" conformations after aspirin treated COX-2 [30,41].