arachidonic acid

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arachidonic acid

 [ah-rak″ĭ-don´ik]
an essential fatty acid that cannot be synthesized by animal tissues and must be obtained in the diet.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ar·a·chi·don·ic ac·id

(ă-rak-i-don'ik as'id),
An unsaturated fatty acid, usually essential in nutrition; the biologic precursor of the prostaglandins, the thromboxanes, and the leukotrienes (collectively known as eicosanoids).
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

arachidonic acid

(ăr′ə-kĭ-dŏn′ĭk)
n.
An unsaturated fatty acid, C20H32O2, present in animal fats and synthesized by the body from linoleic acid, that is essential in human nutrition and is a precursor in the biosynthesis of some prostaglandins.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

arachidonic acid

Biochemistry
A polyunsaturated omega-6 fatty acid, which is an essential dietary component for mammals and the precursor for biosynthesis of prostaglandins, thromboxanes and hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid derivatives (e.g., leukotrienes). Arachidonic acid release from phospholipids is the limiting step in forming its active metabolites.

Nutrition
Foods containing arachidonic acid—e.g., egg yolks, fatty red meat and organ meats—are viewed as unhealthy by nutritionists.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ar·a·chi·don·ic ac·id

(ar'ă-ki-don'ik as'id)
Liquid unsaturated fatty acid that occurs in most animal fats; considered essential in animal nutrition.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

arachidonic acid

An unsaturated fatty acid, formed from LINOLENIC acid, and a precursor of prostaglandins and thomboxanes.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

ar·a·chi·don·ic ac·id

(ar'ă-ki-don'ik as'id)
An unsaturated fatty acid, usually essential in nutrition; the biologic precursor of the prostaglandins, the thromboxanes, and the leukotrienes (collectively known as eicosanoids).
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
PlateletWorks using collagen and PlateletMapping using either ADP or arachidonic acid showed worse accuracy than the other methods.
The mixed-model ANOVA revealed a difference in response between dates for 5 and 10 [micro]mol [1.sup.-1] RN1747 and arachidonic acid, as well as 10 [micro]mol [1.sup.-1] RHC80267.
As a result, the metabolism of arachidonic acid produces oxidized products that behave as potent autocrine and paracrine regulators of cell function and modulate diverse physiologic and pathologic responses including growth and invasiveness of tumor cells (Sigal, 1991; Cao et al., 2000; Hyde and Missailidis, 2009).
In the present study the SSC9 g.5496647_5496662insdel marker showed a significant association with IMF content and arachidonic levels.
The diabetic children had higher levels of omega-6 fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, cis-pentadecenoic acid, heptadecenoic acid, linoleic acid, linolenic acid, and arachidonic acid (Table 3).
It is well known that 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of leukotrienes from arachidonic acid in inflammatory and allergic processes.
For example, COX2 apart from arachidonic acid oxygenates in the same efficiency 2-arachidonylglycerol (endocannabinoid) [14].
ASA exerts its anti-aggregatory effect mostly by inhibiting the platelet COX-1 and subsequently thromboxane formation from the arachidonic acid cascade.
Platelets aggregation was measured after the addition of arachidonic acid as an agonist (Chronolog, Havertown, USA) with a final concentration of 0.5 mg/ml.
1 Although the phacoemulsification technique has improved greatly over the years, still it involves surgical trauma which predisposes the individual to post-operative inflammation.2 Surgical trauma causes a trigger of the arachidonic acid cascade, which in turn generates prostaglandins by activation of cyclooxygenase (COX) 1 and cyclooxygenase 2.
Editor's Note: "Several arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids exert their significant influence on the inflammatory response," write the authors.