gum Arabic

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a·ca·ci·a

(ă-kā'shē-ă),
The dried gummy exudation from Acacia senegal and other species of Acacia (family Leguminosae), prepared as a mucilage and syrup; used as an emollient, demulcent excipient, and suspending agent in pharmaceuticals and foods; formerly used as a transfusion fluid.
Synonym(s): gum arabic
[G. akakia]

A·ca·ci·a

(ă-kā'shē-ă)
1. A tree or shrub with distribution in arid geographic regions.
2. Gum arabic, the dried gummy exudation from Acacia senegal and other species of Acacia (family Leguminosae), prepared as a mucilage and syrup; used as an emollient, demulcent, excipient, and suspending agent in pharmaceuticals and foods; formerly used as a transfusion fluid.
Synonym(s): gum arabic.
[G. akakia]

gum Arabic,

n Latin name:
Acacia senegal; part used: gum; uses: lower cholesterol, kidney conditions, gum disease, oral health, sore throat, diarrhea; precautions: none known. Also called
Egyptian thorn or
senega.

gum

1. a mucilaginous excretion of various plants.
2. see gingiva.

gum arabic
see acacia.
gum tragacanth
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Mujawamariya & Karimov (2014), one acacia tree can produce the average of 0,25 to 2 kg of Arabic gum per year, varying according to the type and climatic conditions.
3, a more severe effect of Arabic gum on the Cl-2 sample is observed from SEM micrographs.
To study the effects of Arabic gum, an accelerated weathering test was utilized to simulate the outdoor conditions.
The glass transition temperatures of the mix containing matodextrin, arabic gum and commercial ice cream mix were -27.
The minister pointed the great importance of the project to Sudan as would protect the Arabic gum belt, help the rehabilitation of natural forests and pastures and increases the area of green trees, beside its role in halting the Desert encroachment and minimize its effects.
The mixture is made from flour, sugar and mastic (a type of plant resin used to make Arabic gum and other Turkish sweets), all cooked in a copper cauldron.
The close similarity of the chemical properties and the functional behavior of the gum has led many to consider mesquite gum as a suitable replacement for arabic gum.
The inherent fragility of the Sahelian zone (project area) is being aggravated by the on-going socio-political crisis which further weakens the resilience of the rural populations and local production systems including cereal crops production, non-timber forestry product (NTFP) such as Arabic gum harvesting and pastoralism.
Vernon-Carter EJ, Gomez SA, Beristain CI, Mosqueira G, Predroza-Islas R, Moreno-Terrazas RC (1996b) Heat degradation and coalescence kinetics of Aztec marigold oleoresin-in-water emulsions stabilized by mesquite or arabic gums and their blends.
Chiefly by imparting texture, hydrocolloids such as guar, xanthan, acacia, arabic gums, konjac flour and cellulose gel can fill a key role that fat plays in many foods: providing the distinctive mouthfeel that lends them their distinguishing characteristics.