a priori

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a priori

Deduced from first principles; in the first instance; without prior knowledge
References in periodicals archive ?
But then it is driven back to confronting the apriorism charge all the more starkly.
We will concentrate on five of them that together allow us to capture most of what is found in the literature: Empiricism, classified by Piaget as objectivist and reductionist, Platonism seen as objectivist and antireductionist, Apriorism (Rationalism) seen as subjectivist and antireductionist, Conventionalism (subjectivist and reductionist), and Dialectics (Piaget's constructivism) that is interactionist and constructivist.
He renders the difference as follows: "an apriorism of the intellectual light (lumen intellectuale) as a formal a priori of the subject in Aquinas, and the apriorism of an idea objectively existing in itself in Augustine.
Apriorism holds that, wherever humans are both investigators and subject matter, the investigators have privileged intuitions that allow them to see clear, inescapable truths about their domain.
Having set out this key to Spinoza's epistemology of nature, Wilson objects to the apriorism she finds implicit in it.
Had Hayek moved from Misesian apriorism to Popperian falsificationism?
Now, I would like to illustrate his principles of action and of apriorism with the help of another branch of social science, namely the sociology of delinquency.
Unless one holds to an apriorism of finitude, a la Heidegger, one should recognize that all human inquiry goes back to God's mystery.
But I believe that the genuine truth contained in Mises' apriorism is not that his findings were irrefutable, but, given that "action" is a philosophical concept and in so far as there is a core of economic science that is inseparable from that concept, then the conclusions of analysis dealing with that core can only be refuted by philosophical, and not by empirical, means.
Although a thorough defense of this claim would require much more room than I have here (including specific refutations of each version of the aprioristic interpretation), I can present two of its elements: first, positive textual evidence that Hegel rejects the distinction; second, an interpretation of the passage most often cited in support of his alleged apriorism, showing that it offers no support at all.
This methodological clarification (similar to Hayek and Machlup's middle ground (14) between extreme apriorism and "ultra-empiricism") has two main consequences: one is philosophical, the other methodological.
20) "Modernism" as a series of conclusions reached on the basis of critical study of texts, rather than a result of a theoretical apriorism held in common found support in a number of other replies to the Vatican condemnation, most notably in Loisy's Simples reflexions.