appointee

(redirected from Appointer)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.
Related to Appointer: appointee

appointee

A person formally appointed to a post (e.g., a consultant), usually via an appointments committee.
References in periodicals archive ?
that the Constitution cedes flexibility to appointers, permitting them
Constituent voters who are unhappy with their assessment take their complaints either to the assessor directly or to the assessor's appointer. In Virginia, districts that require appointed assessors are usually chosen by the Commissioner of Revenue, another elected representative, or in a handful of cases they are appointed by the County Board of Supervisors, which also consists of elected representatives.
The model does not consider age (Judge Posner is over 70, and although one would expect him to be in league with his hero Justice Holmes in this regard, the likelihood of a person of his age being appointed to the Court is slim); nor does it consider the appointer's political party (although President Obama and Judge Posner share a love of the Windy City, it is unlikely that a moderate-to-liberal Democrat would appoint a "conservative" Republican to the Court, even though Judge Posner was a registered Democrat when President Reagan appointed him).
Although the appointment of receivers and managers followed the appointment of the administrators in the Opes Prime collapse, under the Corporations Act the receivers take precedence over the administrators in relation to charged assets and report to the receivers' appointer, rather than to all creditors.
Little wonder, therefore, Lee's handpicked envoy to Tokyo, former lawmaker Kwon Chul-hyun, made absurd remarks such as, ''Even if Japan raises Dokdo, and historical issues, I would keep them in my pocket and not take them out,'' adding that is his appointer's intention.
(2) While appointees cannot be directly controlled by those making appointments, individuals making appointments can attempt to influence the agenda of a board by appointing individuals with beliefs or goals aligned with the appointer.
In his words: "He was negotiator with Pharaoh, miracle worker by a magical rod, logistics expert in leading the exodus and wilderness trek, covenant mediator between Jahwe and Israel, lawgiver to the community, military commander-in-chief against Amalek and Midian, appointer and installer of priests, judge of disputes among the people, and a prophet--indeed more than a prophet, in the directness of his communication with God." (pp.195-196) According to Rosenberg (1986), following the varied inputs from the four, earlier-noted "traditions" over the centuries, there was probably a final editor (Redactor) who codified the Bible in its present form in about 90 C.E.
The religion of the "sick soul" is one which is more prone to the conviction of sin and sense of"something wrong about us as we naturally stand." (2) James's description of the religions melancholic contains the following synthesis which seems to get to the heart of the nature of such an individual: If the individual be of tender conscience and religiously quickened, the unhappiness will take the form of moral remorse and compunction, of feeling inwardly vile and wrong, and of standing in false relations to the author of one's being and the appointer of one's spiritual fate.
He has been told by both Tony Blair, who is actually his appointer, and the Queen, who is his patron, that he is not committed to writing about anything.
The congregation is judge, jury, appointer of experts, and even the appointer of the defendant's lawyer.
(2) A more recent development in New York was the enactment in July 1990 of the Health Care Agents and Proxies Act, which permits New Yorkers to appoint a person to make aU health care decisions, including decisions about life-sustaining treatment, on behalf of the appointer in the event of incapacity.
Through a durable power of attorney, an individual can legally appoint another person to make certain kinds of decisions when the appointer is incapacitated.