statistics

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statistics

 [stah-tis´tiks]
1. a collection of numerical data.
2. the mathematical science dealing with the collection, analysis, and interpretation of numerical data using the theory of probability, especially with methods for drawing inferences about characteristics of a population from examination of a random sample.
vital statistics data, usually collected by governmental bodies, detailing the rates of birth, death, disease, marriage, and divorce in a population.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sta·tis·tics

(stă-tis'tiks),
1. A collection of numeric values, items of information, or other facts that are numerically grouped into definite classes and subject to analysis, particularly analysis of the probability that the resulting empiric findings are due to chance.
2. The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

statistics

Statistics
1. A collection of datapoints or numerical values that can be categorized and subject to analysis; statistics are the raw material on which conclusions about cause-and-effect relationships are based.
2. The field that formally studies cause-and-effect relationships; the systematic collection, classification, and mathematical compilation of data vis-á-vis amount, range, frequency, or prevalence; those methods for planning experiments, obtaining data, and organizing, summarizing, presenting, analyzing, interpreting, and drawing conclusions. See Actuarial statistics, Coefficient of variation, Cusum statistics, Descriptive statistics, Health statistics, Mean, Standard deviation, t test.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sta·tis·tics

(stă-tis'tiks)
1. A collection of numeric values, items of information, or other facts that are numerically grouped into definite classes and subject to analysis, particularly analysis of the probability that the resulting empiric findings are due to chance.
2. The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

statistics

See VITAL STATISTICS.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

sta·tis·tics

(stă-tis'tiks)
A collection of numeric values, items of information, or other facts numerically grouped into definite classes and subject to analysis, particularly of the probability that resulting empiric findings are due to chance.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about statistics

Q. What are the known statistics of Autism: Here is a question which needs a very detailed reply please. What are the known statistics of Autism: incidence, cost and ratio?

A. for more statistical information here are 2 sites:
http://www.autism-society.org/site/PageServer?pagename=about_whatis_factsstats

and here is the CDC site link:
http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/dd/addmprevalence.htm

Q. Do you know if Propecia can truly stop hair loss and even grow back hair. do you have any statistics about it? do you know if there are any side effects to this medication?

A. it does work but there is some side affects, as in E.D. while you are on the med.

Q. What is the statistic number of women having breast cancer or under the threat of having breast cancer? where would i find a good , and reliable info about the disease ?

A. it is said that today 1 out of any 8 women will have breast cancer. there are also men who has breast cancer but the numbers are considerably lower.
about a good source of info- the site that doctoradhi gave you is pretty good, and you can use also the national medical library link:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/breastcancer.html#cat22

good luck!

More discussions about statistics
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References in periodicals archive ?
9:45-11:45 am -- Use of Applied Statistics in Coatings Research and Development--Richard R.
David Heckerman is founder and manager of the Machine Learning and Applied Statistics Group at Microsoft Research.
Minitab Quality Companion[R] is the tool professionals choose to design, organize, and execute their quality projects, and the package industrial engineering and applied statistics instructors can use to prepare their students for professional work.
Worsdale, Tables of Cumulative Distribution Functions for Symmetric Stable Distributions, Applied Statistics 24, 123-131 (1975).
A former pupil at Finham Park School, she recently graduated with distinction in MSc Applied Statistics and Operational Research from Birkbeck College, the University of London and received a Royal Statistical Society prize for her work.
For mechanical technician training, the typical required technical core courses include engineering graphics, descriptive geometry, mechanical drafting, manufacturing processes, applied statistics, strength of materials, and tool design projects.
Moreover, it covers the most important topics in applied statistics and mirrors how it is taught, especially at the graduate level.
Minimal pre-requisites are a year of calculus, a year of applied statistics, and the ability to compute (at least with a spreadsheet).
The father of modern applied statistics, Sir Ronald Fisher, once quipped to Gabriel that weather modification "reminds me of the burnt offerings in the ancient years.
GW Plastics plans to install an automated gauging and SPC software package from Applied Statistics, Inc., St.
This text pinpoints the factors leading to light-emitting diode (LED) and laser degradation and failure using materials science, device physics and applied statistics. This subject is important because a system's functional reliability is limited by its source life time and degradation, and many vital telecommunication systems operate with lightwave signals whose source is either a laser or a LED.

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