Macintosh

(redirected from Apple's macintosh)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Macintosh

Apple’s seminal product that revolutionised the computing industry by incorporating a GUI interface in the operating system. The first primitive Mac, produced in 1984, had the same basic elements now considered standard for all PCs—e.g., software formats like “pull-down” menus, “point-and-shoot” commands, and icons to represent files, programs and landmarks on the desktop, as well as hardware elements such as a mouse to navigate through the software and straightforward screen displays. Macs and modern PCs are “user friendly”, designed so that technologically unsophisticated consumers are able to use computers without the need to understand their internal workings.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
After all, there were only two real options: IBM machines and clones came stacked with Microsoft's Disk Operating System (MSDOS); and Apple's Macintosh had its own patented system.
Not surprisingly, Apple's Macintosh interface guidelines offered almost no useful hints about how to help users navigate through powerful applications, and Microsoft compounded the problem with Windows by grafting poorly-implemented Macintosh conventions on top of the DOS file system.
PowerPC microprocessors, which reduce the number of instructions required to carry out a single command, will be incorporated into Apple's Macintosh computers and into IBM's workstations and servers.
The program developed by the Finnish researchers runs on Apple's Macintosh computers and uses features like a mouse, pull-down menus and both the dialog and other types of windows.
The product operates on Microsoft's Windows/NT, Novell's Net Ware, Apple's Macintosh and on Unix systems, and is compatible with thin client technology.