appetite

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appetite

 [ap´ĕ-tīt]
the desire for food, stimulated by the sight, smell, or thought of food and accompanied by the flow of saliva in the mouth and gastric juice in the stomach. The stomach wall also receives an extra blood supply in preparation for its digestive activity. Appetite is psychological, dependent on memory and associations, as compared with hunger, which is physiologically aroused by the body's need for food. Lack or loss of appetite, known as anorexia, may be due to subjectively unpleasant food, surroundings, or company, or a symptom of either a physical disorder or an emotional disturbance. Excessive appetite may be an indication of either a metabolic disorder or an emotional disturbance.

ap·pe·tite

(ap'ĕ-tīt),
A desire or motive derived from a biologic or psychological need for food, water, sex, or affection; a desire or longing to satisfy any conscious physical or mental need.
Synonym(s): orexia (2)
[L. ad-peto, pp. -petitus, to seek after, desire]

major depressive disorder

Psychiatry A chronic, relapsing illness affecting 3–6% of the population at a given time Lifetime risk 10–15%; it is linked to a high–10% to 20% rate of suicide, and high morbidity when compared with other medical illness Statistics, Intl, low Taiwan 1.5%, Korea 3%, Puerto Rico 4.3%, US 5% High Lebanon 19%, France 16.4%, New Zealand 12% Other findings Positive dexamethasone test, sleep changes–eg, ↓ REM latency DiffDx AIDS, acute intermittent porphyria, amphetamine withdrawal, CA, endocrine disease–eg, Addision's disease, Cushing's disease, hypothyroidism, infectious mononucleosis, influenza, malnutrition, multiple sclerosis, drugs–eg, alpha-methyldopa, benzodiazepines, cimetidine, clonidine, corticosteroids, INH, OCs, propranolol, reserpine, thiazide diuretics
Major depressive disorder, 5 or more criteria
appetite or loss of weight
concentration
• Dysphoric mood Sad, anxious, irritable
• Fatigue or decreased energy
• Guilt or excessive self blame
interest in pleasurable activities
• Psychomotor retardation or agitation
• Sleep disturbances
• Suicidal ideation or suicidal attempt  AMN  16/9/96, p17

ap·pe·tite

(ap'ĕ-tīt)
A desire or motive derived from a biologic or psychological need for food, water, sex, or affection; a desire or longing to satisfy any conscious physical or mental need.
[L. ad-peto, pp. -petitus, to seek after, desire]

appetite

Desire, whether for food, drink, sex, work or anything else that humans can enjoy. Lack of appetite for food is called anorexia, of which a particularly dangerous kind is ANOREXIA NERVOSA.

Appetite

The natural instinctive desire for food. It should be distinguished from hunger, which is the body's craving or need for food (either calories or specific nutrients).

ap·pe·tite

(ap'ĕ-tīt)
A desire derived from a biologic or psychological need for food, water, sex, or affection.
[L. ad-peto, pp. -petitus, to seek after, desire]
References in periodicals archive ?
Three hundred and twenty four (54%) mothers thought that appetite stimulants or multivitamins would make their children stronger and look healthier.
(25) We have been able to demonstrate that use of an appetite stimulant could safely encourage dietary intake and result in gain of both lean and fat weight, suggesting that interventions such as this will be useful in populations with HIV infection and malnutrition, particularly in parts of the world with limited resources.
Because appetite stimulants such as dronabinol affect the central nervous system (CNS), they can produce side effects common to CNS stimulants and interact with certain sedatives, antidepressants, and/or antihistamines.
"If food enhancements don't encourage eating, we use appetite stimulants. Mirtazapine is used for both dogs and cats, and cats particularly respond better to this medication."
Appetite stimulants such as mirtazapine can help, or the cat may need to be syringe fed or to have a feeding tube placed temporarily.
Their porous material emitted wondrous aromas science has identified as proven appetite stimulants. Folks would catch the waft--for example, along New York's Lower East Side "Pickle Alley" in the 1930s--and come running.
The most widely prescribed appetite stimulant is megestrol acetate (Megace[R]) generically.
An alert was triggered, for example, if a physician tried ordering a sedative for a sleepless older patient or an appetite stimulant for an older patient who was ill and losing weight.