appendage

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appendage

 [ah-pen´dij]
a less important portion of an organ, or an outgrowth, such as a tail. Also, a limb or limblike structure.

ap·pend·age

(ă-pen'dij),
Any part, subordinate in function or size, attached to a main structure.
See also: accessory structures.
[L. appendix]

appendage

(ə-pĕn′dĭj)
n.
Biology A part or organ, such as an arm, leg, tail, or fin, that is joined to the axis or trunk of a body.

adnexa

Ancillary structures to main structure. Among health professionals, adnexa usually refers to the fallopian tubes, broad and round uterine ligaments and the ovaries, considered together. Other adnexae in the body include those of the skin (which are more commonly called skin adnexae and include the sweat and apocrine glands, hair and nails) and the eye (which include the eyelids, lacrimal apparatus and orbital tissue), for which the phrase accessory visual structures is more commonly used.

Adnexa

Appendage, ancillary part.
(1) Ovaries, fallopian tubes, associated uterine ligaments—broad, round.
(2) The ancillary glands and structures of the skin—e.g., hair follicles, sebaceous glands.

ap·pend·age

(ă-pen'dăj)
Any part, subordinate in function or size, attached to a main structure.
See also: adnexa
Synonym(s): appendix (1) .
[L. appendix]

appendage

A part or organ of the body joined to another part. A protruding part of the body.

appendage

any projection from the body of an animal, e.g. legs, mouthparts, antennae.

ap·pend·age

(ă-pen'dăj)
Any part, subordinate in function or size, attached to a main structure.
[L. appendix]
References in periodicals archive ?
Small marine crustaceans (such as krill, copepods, and most larvae) often swim and feed with multiple pairs of setose appendages. Many of these appendages, especially those used for moving water or capturing suspended food particles, carry planar arrays of plumose setae--bristles with even smaller, short fibers (setules) distributed evenly along two sides of each bristle.
The study entitled "Late Ediacaran trackways produced by bilaterian animals with paired appendages" was published June 6 in the journal (http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/4/6/eaao6691) Science Advances.
Acute epiploic appendagitis is a self-limited condition caused by torsion of larger appendages, in particular, because smaller ones cannot easily rotate around their own axis.
The characteristic ischemia and necrosis of the epiploic appendages appear to be a consequence of its minimal vasculature and pedunculated shape.
On its outer edge, facing to the right and slightly to the rear, there were the following appendages: two segmented, but relatively short pedipalps (p3, p4) with gnatocoxa, and one chelicera behind them (c3) (Fig.
The present study is aimed to identify the morphological sex of the individual by screening neutrophils for the percentage of various forms nuclear appendages.
Epiploic appendagitis (EA) is a rare cause of acute abdominal pain caused by inflammation of an epiploic appendage. It has a nonspecific clinical presentation that may mimic other acute abdominal pathologies on physical exam, such as appendicitis, diverticulitis, or cholecystitis.
The term Tetrapus refers to Tetrapus Mayr (1885), and Hexapus to a Tetrapus group, who's female have two independent mandibular appendages and hexapodous males, noted as Hexapus subg.
The epiploic appendages vary in shape and size but usually measure about 3 cm long, each.
A team of researchers from the University of Pennsylvania has engineered a raptor-like appendage for a drone, enabling it to grasp objects at high speeds by swooping in like a bird of prey.
TEHRAN (FNA)- The scientists discovered new fossils in Northern Greenland showing that ancient, giant marine animals used bizarre facial appendages to filter food from the ocean.