transferrin

(redirected from Apotransferrin)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Apotransferrin: ferritin, hemosiderin, apoferritin

transferrin

 [trans-fer´in]
a glycoprotein that binds and transports iron; most is produced in the liver. A similar compound produced in the intestinal mucosa is apoferritin.

trans·fer·rin

(trans-fer'in), [MIM*190000]
1. A nonheme β1-globulin of the plasma, capable of associating reversibly with up to 1.25 mcg iron per gram, and acting therefore as an iron-transporting protein.
2. A glycoprotein, found in mammalian milk (lactoferrin) and egg white (conalbumin, ovotransferrin), that binds and transports iron (Fe3+).
[trans- + L. ferrum, iron, + -ia]

transferrin

(trăns-fĕr′ĭn)
n.
A beta globulin in blood serum that combines with and transports iron.

transferrin

Siderophilin An 80-90 kD iron-transporting β-globulin that binds up to 2 atoms of Fe(III) with bicarbonate Ref range 2–4 g/L, US: 250-300 mg/dL. See Carbohydrate-deficient transferrin.

trans·fer·rin

(trans-fer'in)
1. A nonheme β1-globulin of the plasma, capable of associating reversibly with up to 1.25 mcg of iron per gram, and acting therefore as an iron-transporting protein.
2. A glycoprotein, found in mammalian milk (lactoferrin) and egg white (conalbumin, ovotransferrin), that binds and transports iron (Fe3+).
[trans- + L. ferrum, iron, + -ia]

transferrin

A blood protein (beta globulin) that can combine reversibly with iron and transport it to the cells.

transferrin

An iron-binding protein that carries iron in the blood plasma.

transferrin

human iron-binding protein found in the BLOOD PLASMA that reduces the availability of iron to a PATHOGEN.

Transferrin

A protein in blood plasma that carries iron derived from food intake to the liver, spleen, and bone marrow.
Mentioned in: Iron Tests
References in periodicals archive ?
At acidic pH apotransferrin remains bound to TFR1, and the complex is recycled to the cell surface.
Of the positive samples with visual hemolysis, one sample with 0.12 [micro]mol/L NTBI and 80% transferrin saturation contained iron-free apotransferrin and was therefore considered a false positive.
Consequently, four different forms of transferrin with respect to iron content can be distinguished in human serum: apotransferrin, and Nterminal and C-terminal monoferric and diferric transferrin.
Apotransferrin was prepared after dialysis of serum containing either TF CC or CD against an 0.5 mol/L acetate buffer (pH 5.1) for 20 h.
The others have been based on the kinetic method (3) in which oxidized iron ions are bound to apotransferrin, and the change of absorbance of the [Fe.sup.3+]-transferrin complex at 450 nm is followed.
After recycling to the cell surface, the apotransferrin dissociates, and the receptor is free to repeat the process.