cladistics

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Related to Apomorphic: apomorphine, Synapomorphic

cladistics

(klə-dĭs′tĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
A system of classification based on the presumed phylogenetic relationships and evolutionary history of groups of organisms.

cla·dis′tic, cla·dis′ti·cal adj.
cla·dis′ti·cal·ly adv.

cladistics

an approach to CLASSIFICATION by which organisms are ordered and ranked entirely on a basis which reflects recent origin from a common ancestor, i.e. like a family tree. The system is concerned simply with the branching of the tree and not with the degree of difference. The latter is the concern of evolutionary taxonomists who oppose the cladistic approach.
References in periodicals archive ?
Previously, the subfamily was proposed to contain a derived "monophyletic" group of five genera (the "Nothochrysa group") that included Hypochrysa and that was supported by characters presumed to be apomorphic. The four remaining genera, including Kimochrysa, were considered less derived and lacked apomorphic support [4].
This might suggest that the possession of ovaries with an unpaired structure by species in the family Pyrgodesmidae is an apomorphic condition, which probably reflects the small size of individuals in this family (< 10 mm) and their short lifespan of about 3 months (Adis et al., 2000; Pinheiro et al., 2009).
The dorsal processes of the premaxillae are apomorphic, being longer and more vertical than those of any extant or fossil salmonine.
The likely apomorphic reversal of shape of the colobathristid forewings has probably co-evolved jointly with transformation of the shape of mesoscutellum.
Biramous limbs and nauplius larvae, apomorphic characters for crustaceans, can readily be optimized on an evolutionary tree, showing students why these taxa and other crustaceans share taxonomic identity.
In fact this genus could be included within Neornithes on the basis of the following apomorphic feature: humeral articular surface not extended sternally beyond the omal margin of the scapular cotyla (see figure 3).
The number of states per character ranged from 2 to 7, and the total number of apomorphic states was 80.
They can be either ancestral states, termed plesiomorphic, or derived (descendant) states, termed apomorphic. Determining what are plesiomorphic and what are apomorphic states is central to phylogenetic systematics and is termed character polarisation (Cameron and Groves 2004: 107).
These characters were considered apomorphic by Silva (2004).