Dionysian

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Dionysian

[dē·onis′ē·ən]
Etymology: Gk, Dionysos, Greek god of wine
the personal attitude of one who is uninhibited, mystic, sensual, emotional, and irrational and who may seek to escape from the boundaries imposed by the limits of the senses.
References in periodicals archive ?
39) Although we have sufficient evidence to argue that Dionysian, as already the essential drive of Nietzsche's early works, has revealed itself and dominated the later works such as Zarathustra, Twilight of the Idols, The Gay Science, Beyond Good and Evil and Ecce Homo, he does also mention and discuss the ideas of the Apollonian and Dionysian in dualistic form in his Ecce Homo and Late Notebooks while commenting on The Birth of Tragedy.
Recognizing that each of the characters has both Apollonian and Dionysian associations, Riede suggests that while "the Nietzschean terms help to define the world of Empedocles on Etna" it is impossible to discern a clear dialogue between Apollonian and Dionysian forces in the poem (p.
Edited by Janice McCullagh, The Look Homeward, Angel Illustrations of Harvey Harris (2011) grants us the occasion to examine how these artists each uniquely attempted to translate Wolfe's authorial vision and likewise sought to balance Apollonian and Dionysian aesthetics.
To do this, he must experience both Apollonian and Dionysian elements separately, as indeed Amfortas has done, but he must go further and reclaim them as a unity.
James Pilkington, bishop of Durham early in Elizabeth's reign, emerges as a moderate Calvinist with a theology compounded of what Hardman calls Apollonian and Dionysian elements; his social concerns were evidently deeply felt and his views of the religious and political establishment he served were sometimes sharply critical.
Nietzsche argues that Greek tragedy arose out of the fusion of what he termed Apollonian and Dionysian elements--the former representing measure, restraint, harmony, and the latter unbridled passion--and that Socratic rationalism and optimism spelled the death of Greek tragedy.
His body of work makes two things obvious: the first is the musicality of his choreography, and the second is the manner in which his ballets fall into some loose categories that could be defined, equally loosely, as Apollonian and Dionysian.
Oppositions of inside and outside, war and peace, life and death, Apollonian and Dionysian are questioned, but not all resolved, in these immaculately fabricated worlds.
The entire book revolves around conflicting Apollonian and Dionysian desires.