Dionysian

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Dionysian

[dē·onis′ē·ən]
Etymology: Gk, Dionysos, Greek god of wine
the personal attitude of one who is uninhibited, mystic, sensual, emotional, and irrational and who may seek to escape from the boundaries imposed by the limits of the senses.
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast, Mann's Apollonian image of Tadzio is formal and clinical; his pure, divine and radiant sculptured beauty is not sensual but astonishing and compelling.
In his Birth of Tragedy, Nietzsche writes that the Apollonian and the Dionysian are always in tension and opposition, "each by its taunts forcing the other to a more energetic production, both perpetuating in a discordant concord that agon which the term art but feebly designates" (Nietzsche, 1956, 19).
These monstrous and barbaric forces transmitted an ancient wisdom regarding the very existence of the Apollonian Greeks, their "entire existence, with all its beauty and moderation, rested on a hidden ground of suffering and knowledge which was exposed to his gaze once more by the Dionysiac.
Apollonian surface of the dialogue--the link between Apollo and Nomius marking its nomothetic or popular inflection.
Here Daniels remains too close to Nietzsche's own language of the mediation of Dionysian power by Apollonian form, instead of engaging also with more general philosophical and psychological literatures--for example, works by Dewey, Beardsley, and Adorno, among others--that might clarify this phenomenon by drawing on further vocabularies.
The fractal dimension of the Apollonian sphere packing.
The initial dimension of the proposed circular shaped Apollonian fractal shaped antenna is determined by [[lambda].
The story of Marsyas, as told in Callicles' fourth song, concerns the same struggle between Dionysian and Apollonian forces that Nietzsche would later explore in The Birth of Tragedy.
In the Apollonian Anthesteria ceremonies, for example, there were superstitious rituals, human sacrifices, and placation of ghosts.
Nietzsche's aesthetic philosophy centers on the Apollonian and Dionysian "art-worlds" (Tragedy 77) that comprise Greek tragedy as well as the "all-powerful artistic drives in nature" that dictate human instinct (25).
In both the visual and literary arts, this pursuit of a new mode of creative expression gave rise to various aesthetics that blended Dionysian and Apollonian artistic tendencies.