Lavoisier

(redirected from Antoine Lavoisier)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Lavoisier

 [lah-vwah-zya´]
Antoine Laurent (1743–1794). French chemist, born in Paris and later guillotined by the French Revolutionists. Lavoisier demolished the phlogiston theory (a theory of combustion) and explained the true nature of respiration by his introduction of quantitative relations in chemistry. He was secretary and treasurer of a committee seeking the uniformity of weights and measures in France, which led to the establishment of the metric system.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Lavoisier

(la-vwah'sē-yā),
Antoine Laurent, 1743-1794. French lawyer, chemist, and civil servant; his 1789 Elements of Chemistry offered a new and more systematic understanding of the discipline. Died on the guillotine during the Terror in 1794, a victim of the French Revolution.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The bicentennial of Antoine Lavoisier's death, Australian Chemistry Resource Book, 1995 (edited C.
In his seminal study Lavoisier -- the Crucial Year, published in 1961, the historian of science Henry Guerlac challenged the prevailing opinion that Antoine Lavoisier was the founder of modern chemistry because it simply focused on Lavoisier's creative genius and ignored his intellectual heritage.
Antoine Lavoisier performs experiments in Rasero's makeshift chemistry laboratory, where we learn to concoct "alchemical gold" and see water created from two free gases.
In addition, he introduced into American science the chemical nomenclature of Antoine Lavoisier, founder of modern chemistry, and by 1814 was the foremost zoologist as a result of his work on the fish of New York.
After 1802 he lived in France, where he married his second wife, the widow of French chemist Antoine Lavoisier. The Complete Works of Count Rumford were published (1870) by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
The teased material features a GameStop poster that reveals two characters-one who appears to be the next protagonist and one who looks like a chemist, which the report states to be Antoine Lavoisier. Part of the teaser spotted is the add-on content titled "Chemical Revolution," which comes as a preorder mission.
Roberta Baxter's FIRE, WATER AND AIR: THE STORY OF ANTOINE LAVOISIER (1599350874) tells of a wealthy Frenchman who planned to become a lawyer, but who curiosity about science led him to pursue chemistry as his career.
In the late 18th century, chemists Robert Boyle and Antoine Lavoisier developed the idea of simple substances.
Dumas was a great admirer of Antoine Lavoisier and wrote the first four volumes of "Oeuvres de Lavoisier" which appeared between 1862 and 1868 [14].