antivenin

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antivenin

 [an″te-, an″ti-ven´in]
a material used to neutralize the venom of a poisonous animal; it is composed of concentrated purified antibodies from the serum of an immunized animal, frequently a horse.
black widow spider antivenin antivenin (Latrodectus mactans).
antivenin (Crotalidae) polyvalent a serum containing specific venom-neutralizing globulins, produced by immunizing horses with venoms of the fer-de-lance and the western, eastern, and tropical rattlesnakes, used for treatment of envenomation by most pit vipers throughout the world.
antivenin (Latrodectus mactans) a serum containing specific venom-neutralizing globulins, prepared by immunizing horses against venom of the black widow spider (L. mactans).
antivenin (Micrurus fulvius) a serum containing specific venom-neutralizing globulins, produced by immunization of horses with venom of the eastern coral snake (M. fulvius).
North American coral snake antivenin antivenin (Micrurus fulvius).
polyvalent crotaline antivenin antivenin (Crotalidae) polyvalent.

an·ti·ven·in

(an'tē-ven'in), Avoid the misspelling/mispronunciation antivenom.
An antitoxin specific for an animal or insect venom.
Synonym(s): antivenene
[anti- + L. venenum, poison]

antivenin

/an·ti·ven·in/ (-ven´in) a material used in treatment of poisoning by animal venom.
black widow spider antivenin  a. .
antivenin (Crotalidae) polyvalent  a serum containing specific venom-neutralizing globulins, produced by immunizing horses with venoms of the fer-de-lance and the western, eastern, and tropical rattlesnakes, used for treatment of envenomation by most pit vipers throughout the world.
antivenin (Latrodectus mactans)   a serum containing specific venom-neutralizing globulins, prepared by immunizing horses against venom of the black widow spider (L. mactans) .
antivenin (Micrurus fulvius)  , North American coral snake antivenin a serum containing specific venom-neutralizing globulins, produced by immunization of horses with venom of the eastern coral snake (M. fulvius) .
polyvalent crotaline antivenin  a. (Crotalidae) polyvalent.

antivenin

(ăn′tē-vĕn′ĭn, ăn′tī-)
n.
1. An antitoxin active against the venom of a snake, spider, or other venomous animal or insect.
2. An animal serum containing antivenins. It is used in medicine to treat poisoning caused by animal or insect venom.

antivenin

[an′tiven′in]
Etymology: Gk, anti + L, venenum, poison
a suspension of venom-neutralizing antibodies prepared from the serum of immunized horses. Antivenin confers passive immunity and is given as a part of emergency first aid for various snake and insect bites. Also called antivenom.

an·ti·ven·in

(an'tē-ven'in)
An antitoxin specific for an animal or insect venom.
[anti- + L. venenum, poison]

antivenin, antivenene

a material used to neutralize the venom of a poisonous animal. Prepared by immunization of serum-producing animals, usually horses. Antivenins against the venoms of most poisonous snakes, spiders and stinging fish and other aquatic species are available, but only in those areas in which the poisonous species occurs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sutherland, an antivenin expert at Commonwealth Serum Laboratories in Parkville, Australia.
Carroll and his colleagues at the University of Wisconsin-Madison describe their efforts to produce rattlesnake antivenin in chicken eggs.
Russell, a herpetologist at the University of Arizona in Tucson, who is collaborating with other researchers to make a better North American snake antivenin.
For this reason, he and others note, rapid treatment with an appropriate antivenin can provide critical relief even when a bite is not life-threatening.
The tricky part of antivenin production lies in the purification, scientists agree.
In part to minimize such reactions, Therapeutic Antibodies researchers make antivenin by injecting venoms into sheep rather than horses.
Egen, a University of Arizona herpetologist helping to develop the sheep antivenin, the team uses an enzyme called papain to partially digest the purified antibodies.
Thalley, who works with Carroll on the chicken-based antivenin, the Wisconsin team has already tripled their yield to about 3.