Antitussives


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Related to Antitussives: Expectorants

Antitussives

Drugs used to suppress coughing.
Mentioned in: Cough
References in periodicals archive ?
Purpose: The present clinical trial aimed to compare the antitussive effect of KJ with placebo (PL) and bromhexine (BH) among patients of 18-65 years old with non-complicated upper respiratory infections (URI; i.
1,3,4] Sixty-one per cent prescribers responded that they prescribe antitussives for cough.
Observational results showed no difference in percentage of cough resolution between children treated with antitussive alone vs children receiving a combination of antibiotics and antitussives.
2] agonists, xanthenes, antitussives, decongestants, expectorants, or antihistamines.
We found 6 Cochrane reviews of cold treatments, including antitussives, antihistamines, decongestants, vitamin C, echinacea, and zinc lozenges.
OTC cough and cold products examined in the study include: decongestants (for unclogging a stuffy nose), expectorants (for loosening mucus so that it can be coughed up), and antitussives (for quieting coughs).
They covered antitussives, which are used to relieve coughs; expectorants, which promote the discharge of mucus from the respiratory tract; and combinations of drugs such as antihistamine and decongestant.
11) Hydration and cough suppressants can "reduce laryngeal trauma associated with coughing unless the pulmonary condition and need to clear secretions militate against the use of antitussives.
Antihistamines, decongestants, and antitussives are common medications in cough and cold preparations; many OTC cough medications contain several active ingredients (Hartley, 2003) (see Table 3 for a list of common medications used for cough).
More than 400 spontaneous reports of serious adverse events associated with antitussives containing hydrocodone have been reported to the FDA's voluntary MedWatch program since 2005, including deaths due to overdose, although the agency cannot separate out those pertaining to unapproved versus approved products, Dr.
The ingredients under review are decongestants, first-generation antihistamines, antitussives, and expectorants, which are regulated by a monograph, under which they are classified as "generally recognized as safe and effective," based on advisory committee recommendations from 30 years ago.
It would be wise for doctors to prescribe antitussives that do not contain codeine, promethazine hydrochloride or other substances that have high abuse potential, such as benzonate (Tessalon Perles) and dextromethorphan (Robitussin DM).