Antitussives


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Related to Antitussives: Expectorants

Antitussives

Drugs used to suppress coughing.
Mentioned in: Cough
References in periodicals archive ?
The oregano 'orejon' (Plectranthus amboinicus), which belongs to the Coleus genus (Lamiacea family) and is also known as 'french' oregano in Cuba, has shown to possess antitussive, bacteriostatic (70% ethanol), antioxidant (30% ethanol) and phytobiotic activities due to its essential oils, rich in thymol and carvacrol (Menendez and Pavon, 1999; Bakkali et al, 2008).
In recent years, novel antitussives are under development, but the primary outcome measure of antitussive drugs is still subjective, which harms the interests of patients.
Purpose: The present clinical trial aimed to compare the antitussive effect of KJ with placebo (PL) and bromhexine (BH) among patients of 18-65 years old with non-complicated upper respiratory infections (URI; i.e., common cold).
[1] An irritative, non-productive cough may be suppressed by an antitussive agent, which increases the threshold of the cough center.
Of the children, 89 received antibiotics only, while 38 received a combination of antibiotics and antitussives; central (codeine and cloperastine) in 16 cases, and peripheral (levodropropizine) in 22 children.
* Antitussives, Dextromethorphan: Delsym (41% of 2,984 pharmacist recommendations)
Mezclitas are liquid mixtures of cough and cold medications combined with other prescription products including corticosteroids, bronchodilators, and narcotic antitussives. Mezclitas is the term in Spanish used by both health care professionals and patients when referring to these mixtures.
Currently available antitussives. Pulm Pharm Ther 2009;22:148-151.
Resinates are used in the pharmaceutical industry for several purposes, including extended release products such as the antitussives, Delsym and Tussionex.
We found 6 Cochrane reviews of cold treatments, including antitussives, antihistamines, decongestants, vitamin C, echinacea, and zinc lozenges.
Medications affected by the advisory are marketed as decongestants, expectorants, antihistamines and antitussives. A review of information presented at a joint Nonprescription Drugs and Pediatric Advisory Committee meeting in October 2007, along with reports received by FDA officials about side effects, led to the conclusion that over-the-counter cough and cold remedies are neither safe nor effective for infants and children younger than 2.
OTC cough and cold products examined in the study include: decongestants (for unclogging a stuffy nose), expectorants (for loosening mucus so that it can be coughed up), and antitussives (for quieting coughs).