antitrust law

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antitrust law

Legislation that limits the ability of an enterprise or group of individuals to monopolise a service or product, thereby controlling and restricting free trade.

antitrust law

Government Legislation that limits the ability of organizations or groups of individuals to monopolize a service–or product, thereby controlling and restricting free trade. See Safe harbor rules.
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The Guidance also discusses how the antitrust laws apply to companies' decisions to share sensitive compensation and other employment-related information with competing employers.
The view that antitrust laws are required to protect and promote competition has, however, been seriously contested, especially since the publication in 1978 of The Antitrust Paradox: A Policy at War with Itself by law professor and federal appellate court judge Robert Bork.
Indeed, South Dakota passed its own state antitrust law during the first month of its statehood.
American antitrust laws prohibit anticompetitive activity by firms acting either alone or coordinately}4 Coordinated anticompetitive activity ("collusion") is prohibited by section 1 of the Sherman Act ("Section 1"), which states that "[e]very contract, combination in the form of trust or otherwise, or conspiracy, in restraint of trade or commerce among the several States, or with foreign nations, is declared to be illegal.
Although the chances of success were slim, if the NFL had convinced the Court that it operated as a single entity, antitrust law would no longer apply to the NFL and most likely every other sports league.
He is also a member of the American Bar Association's Antitrust Law Section and a member of the Robinson-Patman Act Committee.
According to the Business Roundtable (2004), the antitrust laws and the intellectual property laws share a common objective: the enhancement of consumer welfare through the promotion of innovation.
17) Second, in a world with extraterritorial application of antitrust laws, the most restrictive antitrust laws will always govern business behavior even if those antitrust laws prove suboptimal.
But the AT&T case demonstrates that enforcement of antitrust laws can generate as much or more intervention.
In June this year, the appeals court supported Jackson's findings that Microsoft violated antitrust laws.
Therefore, great care must be taken to minimize the risk of not only violating antitrust laws but also being subject to antitrust investigations or litigation.