antitoxin

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antitoxin

 [an´tĭ-tok″sin]
a particular kind of antibody produced in the body in response to the presence of a toxin; see also immunity. adj., adj an´titoxic.
botulism antitoxin an equine antitoxin against the toxins produced by the types A and B and/ or E strains of Clostridium botulinum; administered intravenously in the postexposure prophylaxis and treatment of botulism, other than infant botulism. Generally trivalent (ABE) antitoxin is used.
diphtheria antitoxin equine antitoxin from horses immunized against diphtheria toxin or the toxoid; administered intramuscularly or intravenously in the treatment of suspected cases of diphtheria.
equine antitoxin an antitoxin derived from the blood of healthy horses immunized against a specific bacterial toxin.
tetanus antitoxin equine antitoxin from horses that have been immunized against tetanus toxin or toxoid; used for the passive prevention and treatment of tetanus. It is rarely used, tetanus immune globulin being preferred.

an·ti·tox·in

(an'tē-tok'sin),
Antibody formed in response to antigenic poisonous substances of biologic origin, such as bacterial exotoxins (for example, those elaborated by Clostridium tetani or Corynebacterium diphtheriae), phytotoxins, and zootoxins; in general usage, antitoxin refers to whole, or globulin fraction of, serum from people or animals (usually horses) immunized by injections of the specific toxoid. Antitoxin neutralizes the pharmacologic effects of its specific toxin in vitro, and also in vivo if the toxin is not already fixed to the tissue cells.
[anti- + G. toxikon, poison]

antitoxin

(ăn′tē-tŏk′sĭn, ăn′tī-)
n.
1. An antibody formed in response to and capable of neutralizing a specific toxin of biological origin.
2. An animal or human serum containing antitoxins. It is used in medicine to prevent or treat diseases caused by the action of biological toxins, such as tetanus, botulism, and diphtheria.

antitoxin

Immunology An antibody-rich serum from an animal stimulated with specific antigens or bacterial toxins–eg, botulinus, tetanus or diphtheria, which is used to provide passive immunity. See Passive immunity.

an·ti·tox·in

(an'tē-tok'sin)
Antibody formed in response to antigenic poisonous substances of biologic origin (e.g., bacterial exotoxins, phytotoxins, and zootoxins); in general usage, serum from humans or animals (usually horses) immunized by injections of the specific toxoid. Antitoxin neutralizes the pharmacologic effects of its specific toxin.
[anti- + G. toxikon, poison]

antitoxin

An ANTIBODY formed by the immune system in response to the presence of TOXIN, produced by bacteria.

antitoxin

a type of ANTIBODY that neutralizes TOXINS.

Antitoxin

An antibody that is capable of neutralizing the specific toxin (a specific cause of disease) that stimulated its production in the body and is produced in animals for medical purposes by injection of a toxin or toxoid with the resulting serum being used to counteract the toxin in other individuals.

an·ti·tox·in

(an'tē-tok'sin)
Antibody formed in response to antigenic poisonous substances of biologic origin; in general usage, antitoxin refers to whole, or globulin fraction of, serum from people immunized by injections of the specific toxoid.
[anti- + G. toxikon, poison]
References in periodicals archive ?
Access to diphtheria antitoxin for therapy and diagnostics.
Use of diphtheria antitoxin (DAT) for suspected diphtheria cases [cited 2015 Aug 19].
In the present study, toxin antitoxin neutralization test on the skin of albino guinea pigs and lethal toxicity test I/P in mice were applied using specific antitoxin to detect and identify the toxigenic strains of C.perfringens recovered from laboratory animal.
Thus, It was proposed the existence of chemical and non-biological interactions between toxin and antitoxin, at the same time mediated the first by the presence of two groups that he named toxophore and haptophore, one of those had no toxic effect.
He considers antitoxin (antibody) a normal component of the cell with special <<sidechains>> (Receptors) as part of the operational cellular apparatus.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC; Atlanta, GA, USA) provided heptavalent (anti-ABCDEFG) equine F(ab')2 antitoxin, but because of progressive clinical improvement, it was surmised that no toxin remained in circulation, and the antitoxin was not administered.
The antitoxin has been tested in animals, and is in the process of being tested for efficacy in humans.
This discovery was instrumental to the development of antitoxin by Emil von Behring in 1890, for which Behring won the first ever Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine.
Therapy for botulism is largely supportive, although prompt administration of an antitoxin may reduce the severity of symptoms by neutralizing unbound toxin in circulation.
When cells are relieved from stress antitoxin protein replenishes its cognate toxin molecule, leading to resumption of growth following start of protein translation [6].
Mulford enabled the Philadelphia firm to sell in 1895 the first commercial diphtheria antitoxin manufactured in the United States.
An antitoxin would make a welcome addition to the bare arsenal currently available to physicians faced with Buruli ulcer.