antisocial personality disorder

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Related to Antisocial tendencies: Dissocial

antisocial

 [an″te-, an″ti-so´shal]
1. denoting behavior that violates the rights of others, societal mores, or the law.
2. denoting the specific personality traits seen in antisocial personality disorder.
antisocial personality disorder a personality disorder characterized by a conspicuous disregard for the rights and needs of others. Antisocial behavior begins before the age of 15 and includes such behaviors as truancy, delinquency, theft, and vandalism. Adults with this disorder show a lack of maturity, unwillingness to take responsibility, and emotional instability. The chief characteristic of such persons is an apparent lack of conscience. Their behavior includes a variety of antisocial and criminal acts, such as theft, engaging in an illegal occupation (for example, selling drugs), repeated defaulting on debts, sexual promiscuity, and repeated lying. In addition, an antisocial personality is often impulsive and aggressive and is unable to maintain consistent, responsible functioning at work, at school, or as a parent. Substance abuse is common.

As in other personality disorders, individuals with antisocial personality disorders refuse to admit to any problems. A patient who is a criminal may honestly believe that anyone who is not a criminal is merely stupid. Those with antisocial personalities often seem to be unable to learn from experience. They also are seldom willing to accept psychiatric help and when they do agree to consult a mental health professional, it is often only to avoid the legal consequences of their activity.

an·ti·so·cial per·son·al·i·ty dis·or·der

1. an enduring and pervasive pattern characterized by continuous and chronic antisocial behavior with disregard for and violation of the rights and safety of others, beginning before the age of 15; early childhood signs include chronic lying, stealing, fighting, and truancy; in adolescence there may be unusually early or aggressive sexual behavior, excessive drinking, and use of illicit drugs, such behavior continuing in adulthood.
2. a DSM diagnosis that is established when the specified criteria are met.

antisocial personality disorder

n.
A personality disorder characterized by chronic antisocial behavior and violation of the law and the rights of others.

antisocial personality disorder

Dyssocial personality disorder, psychopathy, sociopathy Psychiatry A disorder affecting an individual with complete disregard for the rights of others, who engages in antisocial behavior without remorse; APD begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood Prevalence 3% ♀; 1% ♂; more common with substance abuse or in prison, or forensic settings. See Conduct disorder, Personality disorder.
Antisocial personality disorder
  1. Pervasive pattern of disregard for & violation of rights of others occurring from age 15, indicated by 3 + of following
    1. Failure to conform to social norms with respect to lawful behaviors that is grounds for arrest
    2. Deceitfulness as indicated by repeated lying, use of aliases, manipulating others for personal profit or pleasure
    3. Impulsivity or failure to plan ahead
    4. Irritability & aggressiveness, indicated by repeated physical assault
    5. Reckless disregard for safety of self or others
    6. Consistent irresponsibility, indicated by inconsistent work behavior or not honoring financial commitments
    7. Lack of remorse, indicated by indifference to, or rationalizing having hurt, mistreated, or stolen from another
  2. Age ≥ 18
  3. Evidence of a conduct disorder–see there–before age 15
  4. .
  5. APD-defining behavior doesn't occur exclusively during course of schizophrenia or manic episode
.

an·ti·so·cial per·son·al·i·ty dis·or·der

(an'tē-sō'shăl pĕr-sŏn-al'i-tē dis-ōr'dĕr)
Mental state characterized by a history of continuous and chronic antisocial behavior with disregard for and violation of the rights of others, beginning before the age of 15 years; early childhood signs include chronic lying, stealing, fighting, and truancy; in adolescence there may be unusually early or aggressive sexual behavior, excessive drinking, and use of illicit drugs. Such behavior continues to adulthood.

antisocial personality disorder

A condition of defective capacity for affection or for feeling for others. Affected people are conscienceless and seemingly unaware of the destructive effects of their behaviour on others. They cannot form satisfactory relationships in marriage or at work and often manifest uncontrolled aggression. Stealing, gambling, drug-taking, alcoholism, fire-raising and assault are common features. Such people do not respond to punishment and are a source of much trouble to society. It is questionable whether there is any effective treatment, but see THERAPEUTIC COMMUNITY.
References in periodicals archive ?
Childhood victimization was a significant predictor of the number of lifetime symptoms of antisocial tendencies and of a diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder (Luntz and Widom, 1994).
Family studies indicate that fathers with severe antisocial tendencies have significantly higher lifetime alcohol dependencies and drug abuse or drug dependence diagnoses compared to fathers whose antisocial behavior desisted in adulthood.
A single neurological problem may underlie both childhood ADHD and later antisocial tendencies, or a variety of biological and social influences may shape the troubled behavior of youngsters who then receive a common diagnosis such as ADHD or antisocial or conduct disorder, Hartmann argues.
But, individuals who manifest symptoms of ADHD in childhood and develop antisocial tendencies in adolescence have a significantly higher rate of confrontational contacts with the criminal justice system than do members of the general population.
Perhaps how research has shown that people with a recessive gene in spot 148 in their DNA are carriers of antisocial tendencies and should be sterilized?
Given sufficient study, the Negro American "Aunt Dicy" and "Aunt Nancy," the West Indian "Sister Nancy," and the untrustworthy women of Hausa trickster and morality tales might encourage Harris and other critics to fully appreciate the view illustrated in African and African American folk tradition that independence, selfishness, and amorality are human, rather than masculine, characteristics.(3) The goal of trickster and morality tales, then, becomes not to identify the antisocial tendencies of either men or women but rather to eradicate those predilections in both genders.
Parents and teachers might think their kid is a bully, acts out and is a behaviour problem because they have a conduct disorder or antisocial tendencies," Kashdan said.
One could imagine that if Dilbert gave up his cubicle took on a furniture delivery job for a dysfunctional company named Nimbus and succumbed to his latent antisocial tendencies he might very well become this book's protagonist James Pichaske.
But, fortunately for all concerned, he was referred to a neurologist who diagnosed Asperger's Syndrome, a form of autism characterised by antisocial tendencies, and Nicholls plunged into a lengthy course of treatment.
Once upon a time, people with mildly antisocial tendencies went sent to Australia under duress.