antisocial behavior


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Related to antisocial behavior: antisocial personality disorder

antisocial behavior

behavior that is inimical to the rights of others, or to the rules of society, but not necessarily severe enough to incur a legal penalty. Compare: juvenile delinquent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Self-determination theory (SDT; Deci & Ryan, 2000) has been used as a framework for investigating the psychological mechanisms underlying athletes' prosocial and antisocial behavior (Hodge & Lonsdale, 2011).
High quality coach-athlete connections may protect against antisocial behavior and support prosocial behavior (coaches who maintain good links with their athletes diminish antisocial behavior).
There may be other factors that lead to both increased TV watching during childhood and adolescence and antisocial behaviors.
The importance of studying goals as they relate to antisocial behavior has been highlighted in the work of certain authors (Carroll et al.
Explaining the Co-occurrence of Antisocial Behavior and Depression
There are few well-designed international comparisons of student antisocial behavior; some show similarities in rates of antisocial behavior and others show differences, particularly in relation to substance use.
Although early puberty did not affect either a preference for mornings or evenings or the cortisol ratio, it was related to more antisocial behavior in boys and relational aggression in girls.
This paper summarizes the heritability of each of these aspects or correlates of antisocial behavior and discusses research attempting to unpack the genetic and environmental "black boxes" involved in antisocial behavior, including studies investigating the influence of both biological and social risk factors and how they might be mediated by genetic and environmental factors.
Despite introducing several control variables into their model, these authors found that the use of corporal punishment predicted an increase in later antisocial behavior among children.
One unique environmental common factor affected primarily the risk for adult antisocial behavior and conduct disorder.
Moreover, 85 percent of severely maltreated boys with the low-activity MAOA gene developed antisocial behavior by young adulthood.