antiretroviral

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antiretroviral

 [an″te-, an″ti-ret´ro-vi″ral]
1. effective against retroviruses.
2. an agent with this quality.

antiretroviral

(ăn′tē-rĕt′rō-vī′rəl, ăn′tī-)
adj.
Destroying or inhibiting the replication of retroviruses.
n.
An antiretroviral drug.

antiretroviral

Virology adjective Referring to an agent or effect that counters a retrovirus noun A drug that counters or acts against a retrovirus, usually understood to be HIV; FDA-approved antiretrovirals include reverse transcriptase inhibitors, nucleoside analogues and protease inhibitors See Antiretroviral, Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Treatment of patients with antiretroviral drugs will reduce their viral load and improve their immunity, which should result in less arterial damage and fewer patients with acute HIV-related vasculopathy.
Having at least two active antiretroviral drugs in the regimen.
In a new approach to HIV prevention, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will fund a multinational trial of the antiretroviral drug tenofovir, taken orally once daily by HIV negative persons at high risk, to see if it can prevent HIV infection.
Among HIV-infected pregnant women, those who receive combination antiretroviral drug therapy have rates of premature delivery and stillbirth similar to those receiving monotherapy or no therapy, and they are no more likely to deliver a baby with low birth weight or low Apgar scores, according to a combined analysis of multiple studies performed in the United States.
Resistance testing to determine antiretroviral drug susceptibility "is now the standard of care" in most parts of the United States, Dr.
NEW ORLEANS -- Antiretroviral exposure during pregnancy is not associated with an increased risk of birth defects, but certain antiretroviral drug combinations may increase the risk of preterm delivery, studies presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine suggest.
In the first preliminary study of this strategy, Xia Jin of the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center injected a vaccine into four patients who were on antiretroviral drug therapy.
The prevalence of antiretroviral drug resistance in the U.S.
Researchers at Makerere University in Uganda want to study a neonatal HIV vaccine as a potential strategy for protecting breastfeeding infants against infection, which would be used following antiretroviral drug therapy perinatally (1).
There are general guidelines for antiretroviral drug use during pregnancy for HIV-infected women, but the potential impact of such therapy on the fetus and infant is unknown.
Antiretroviral drug resistance testing in adult HIV-1 infection.
Among patients who said that they were on antiretroviral drug treatment, the prevalence of resistance was 87%.