antiretroviral

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antiretroviral

 [an″te-, an″ti-ret´ro-vi″ral]
1. effective against retroviruses.
2. an agent with this quality.

antiretroviral

/an·ti·ret·ro·vi·ral/ (-ret´ro-vi″ral) effective against retroviruses, or an agent with this quality.

antiretroviral

(ăn′tē-rĕt′rō-vī′rəl, ăn′tī-)
adj.
Destroying or inhibiting the replication of retroviruses.
n.
An antiretroviral drug.

antiretroviral

[an′te-, an′ti-ret′ro-vi′ral]
1 effective against retroviruses.
2 a substance or drug that stops or suppresses the activity of retroviruses such as HIV.

antiretroviral

Virology adjective Referring to an agent or effect that counters a retrovirus noun A drug that counters or acts against a retrovirus, usually understood to be HIV; FDA-approved antiretrovirals include reverse transcriptase inhibitors, nucleoside analogues and protease inhibitors See Antiretroviral, Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Future of HIV vasculopathy when our patients are on antiretroviral drugs
Treating patients who had previously been treated with no more than 10 antiretroviral drugs.
HIV-infected pregnant women can take antiretroviral drugs to improve their health and decrease the likelihood of mother-to-child HIV transmission, but the impact of these drugs on pregnancy outcomes has not been determined.
Despite the virus' ability to mutate rapidly, simultaneous treatment with three or more antiretroviral drugs has succeeded in beating back HIV concentrations in the blood of many patients.
SAN FRANCISCO -- Greater antiretroviral suppression was maintained after 24 weeks of therapy with MK-0518i, an investigational oral HIV integrase inhibitor in combination with optimized background therapy (OBT) versus placebo plus OBT in HIV-infected patients who failed antiretroviral therapy (ART) and who were resistant to drugs in all three classes of oral antiretroviral drugs.
The vaccine will be compared to standard antiretroviral drug therapy for HIV.
Although clinical studies showing marginal efficacy of didanosine monotherapy were used to get approval for the drug's registration, monotherapy is no longer considered optimal use of this or any antiretroviral drug.
When zalcitabine (Hivid) received marketing clearance from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in June 1992, it became the first antiretroviral drug licensed under the accelerated approval process.
This product differs from currently available antiretroviral drug therapies since it is designed to stimulate an HIV-infected individual's immune system to fight the virus.
A1: With regard to treatment of HIV-infected individuals with advanced disease, physicians should be aware that the severe hepatotoxicity has been described in patients receiving nevirapine as part of combination antiretroviral drug regimens, although this complication appears to be uncommon.
IR103 differs from currently available antiretroviral drug therapies in that it is an immune-based therapy designed to replenish and enhance key immune cells that have been destroyed by the virus, thus allowing stimulation of an HIV-infected individual's immune system to fight the virus.
In Ethiopia, Intelesense will provide the backbone of a telecommunications system to monitor antiretroviral drug therapies for AIDS patients.