antipyretic

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Related to Antipyretics: Paracetamol, aspirin, Antibiotics

antipyretic

 [an″te-, an″ti-pi-ret´ik]
1. effective against fever; called also antifebrile.
2. something having this effect, such as a cold pack, aspirin, or quinine; antipyretic drugs dilate the blood vessels near the surface of the skin, thereby allowing more blood to flow through the skin, where it can be cooled by the air. An antipyretic can also increase perspiration, the evaporation of which cools the body. Called also febricide and febrifuge.

an·ti·py·ret·ic

(an'tē-pī-ret'ik),
1. Reducing fever. Synonym(s): antifebrile, febrifugal
2. An agent that reduces fever (for example, acetaminophen, aspirin). Synonym(s): febrifuge
[anti- + G. pyretos, fever]

antipyretic

(ăn′tē-pī-rĕt′ĭk, ăn′tī-)
adj.
Reducing or tending to reduce fever.
n.
A medication that reduces fever.

an′ti·py·re′sis (-rē′sĭs) n.

antipyretic

Antifebrile adjective Referring to an antifebrile agent or effect noun An agent that relieves or reduces fever

an·ti·py·ret·ic

(an'tē-pī-ret'ik)
1. Reducing fever.
Synonym(s): antifebrile.
2. An agent that reduces fever (e.g., aspirin).
[anti- + G. pyretos, fever]

antipyretic

A drug or other measure which lowers a raised body temperature.

Antipyretic

A drug that lowers fever, like aspirin or acetaminophen.
Mentioned in: Fever

an·ti·py·ret·ic

(an'tē-pī-ret'ik)
1. Reducing fever.
Synonym(s): antifebrile, febrifugal.
2. An agent that reduces fever (e.g., acetaminophen, aspirin).
[anti- + G. pyretos, fever]
References in periodicals archive ?
[2,15] In our study, 34.4% households had unused antacids followed by antipyretics (31.25%) and antibiotics (28.1%).
Acetaminophen was the preferred antipyretic (57.2%), followed by mefenamic acid (35.1%) (Table 1).
Antipyretic treatment for influenza increases mortality in animals, according to a 2010 review and meta-analysis led by Sally Eyers.
In the study it was noticed that the classes of drugs that were commonly used were antipyretics (78%), analgesics (72%), antihistamines (42%) and antibiotics (38%).
Although fever was considered a protective response for thousands of years the advent of antipyretic drugs has led to the common belief that fever is maladaptive and harmful3 and can cause brain damage and death.
* Antipyretics should be used to make the child more comfortable and not used routinely with the sole aim of reducing the temperature.
Active dry Saccharomyces cerevisiae: brewer's yeast (Griffchem[R]) was used to induce pyrexia in the antipyretic study.
While it is not necessary to treat fever with antipyretics, it doesn't appear to do any harm if the drugs are used according to instructions, and they may also help with pain and other symptoms.
Generally, 54% of the patients were found to have used antipyretics with inappropriate dosage.
In the US alone, manufacturers' revenue from internal non-narcotic analgesics, antipyretics, antiarthritics and anti-inflammatories, including salicylates and acetaminophen, totaled USD2.4bn in 2009, according to August 2010 report published by the US Census Bureau.