antipyretic

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Related to Antipyretics: Paracetamol, aspirin, Antibiotics

antipyretic

 [an″te-, an″ti-pi-ret´ik]
1. effective against fever; called also antifebrile.
2. something having this effect, such as a cold pack, aspirin, or quinine; antipyretic drugs dilate the blood vessels near the surface of the skin, thereby allowing more blood to flow through the skin, where it can be cooled by the air. An antipyretic can also increase perspiration, the evaporation of which cools the body. Called also febricide and febrifuge.

an·ti·py·ret·ic

(an'tē-pī-ret'ik),
1. Reducing fever. Synonym(s): antifebrile, febrifugal
2. An agent that reduces fever (for example, acetaminophen, aspirin). Synonym(s): febrifuge
[anti- + G. pyretos, fever]

antipyretic

/an·ti·py·ret·ic/ (-pi-ret´ik)
1. relieving or reducing fever.
2. an agent that so acts.

antipyretic

(ăn′tē-pī-rĕt′ĭk, ăn′tī-)
adj.
Reducing or tending to reduce fever.
n.
A medication that reduces fever.

an′ti·py·re′sis (-rē′sĭs) n.

antipyretic

[-pīret′ik]
Etymology: Gk, anti + pyretos, fever
1 pertaining to a substance or procedure that reduces fever. antipyresis, n.
2 an antipyretic agent. Such drugs usually lower the thermodetection set point of the hypothalamic heat regulatory center, with resulting vasodilation and diaphoresis. Widely used antipyretic agents are acetaminophen, aspirin, and NSAIDs. Also called antefebrile, antifebrile, antithermic.

antipyretic

Antifebrile adjective Referring to an antifebrile agent or effect noun An agent that relieves or reduces fever

an·ti·py·ret·ic

(an'tē-pī-ret'ik)
1. Reducing fever.
Synonym(s): antifebrile.
2. An agent that reduces fever (e.g., aspirin).
[anti- + G. pyretos, fever]

antipyretic

A drug or other measure which lowers a raised body temperature.

Antipyretic

A drug that lowers fever, like aspirin or acetaminophen.
Mentioned in: Fever

antipyretic

an agent that reduces body temperature, e.g. aspirin

antipyretic,

adj/n a drug that reduces fever. Also known as
febrifuge.

an·ti·py·ret·ic

(an'tē-pī-ret'ik)
1. Reducing fever.
Synonym(s): antifebrile, febrifugal.
2. An agent that reduces fever (e.g., acetaminophen, aspirin).
[anti- + G. pyretos, fever]

antipyretic (an´tīpīret´ik),

n a drug that reduces fever primarily through action on the hypothalamus, thereby resulting in increased heat dissipation through augmented peripheral blood flow and sweating.

antipyretic

1. effective against fever.
2. an agent that relieves fever. Cold packs, aspirin and quinine are all antipyretics. Antipyretic drugs dilate the blood vessels near the surface of the skin, thereby allowing more blood to flow through the skin with increased heat loss by radiation and convection. Also, an antipyretic can increase perspiration, the evaporation of which cools the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fever: beneficial and detrimental effects of antipyretics.
Antipyretics should be used to make the child more comfortable and not used routinely with the sole aim of reducing the temperature.
There is no evidence from these studies that antipyretics have any significant effect in reducing the response to infection.
Conclusion: Mothers' definition of fever and antipyretic utilization knowledge are insufficient.
To calculate the dose of the antipyretics accurately the body weights of all patients were measured again in the hospital.
Both acetaminophen and ibuprofen are effective antipyretic agents in children with history of febrile seizures (Carson, 2003; Goldman, Ko, Linett, & Scolnik, 2004; Hay et al.
A Cochrane review showed that cool water sponging caused fever reduction similar to antipyretics at 1 hour; sponging combined with ibuprofen reduced the proportion of patients still febrile at 1 hour.
He said: "With the number of swine flu infections increasing in the West Midlands and elsewhere, the Government should lift the restriction on the amount of simple antipyretics drugs which reduce fever and can be sold over the counter at any one time.
Both studies found evidence that many parents still suffer from "fever phobia," which can result in overly aggressive dosing of antipyretics.
7) Antipyretics are prescribed commonly in children with pyrexia, despite minimal evidence of clinical benefit.