antiperspirant

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antiperspirant

 [an″te-, an″ti-per´spir-ant]
1. suppressing sweating.
2. an agent that so acts.

an·ti·per·spi·rant

(an'tē-per'spi-rant),
1. Having an inhibitory action upon the secretion of sweat.
2. An agent having such an action (for example, aluminum chloride). Synonym(s): anhidrotic (2)

antiperspirant

(ăn′tē-pûr′spər-ənt, ăn′tī-)
n.
An astringent preparation applied to the skin to decrease perspiration.

an′ti·per′spi·rant adj.

an·ti·per·spi·rant

(an'tē-pĕr'spir-ănt)
An agent that has an inhibitory action on the secretion of sweat (e.g., aluminum chloride).

antiperspirant

A drug or skin preparation used to inhibit perspiration or prevent excessive perspiration.
References in periodicals archive ?
BASE swab sample was taken immediately after hot water shower with plain soap (with no antiperspirants nor antibacterial substances and application of NEU-STIC Neutralizing Deodorant).
In 2018, the global antiperspirant and deodorant market is estimated to be worth about $72.7 billion.
The company, which says it revolutionized the category with the introduction of Dry Spray antiperspirant a little over two years ago, late last year introduced new Anti-Marks Antiperspirant Technology that helps prevent white marks on dark clothes and the formation of yellow stains on white clothes.
The Dry Spray Anti-Marks Antiperspirant Technology launch will be supported by marketing initiatives across all five brands in 2017.
Just as clinicians do not always use the strongest medicines but choose the safest ones, especially ones that can be self-administered and self-guided, teaching patients how to use antiperspirants when they will work "is as important as being able to effectively and safely inject neurotoxins," Dr.
Encourage him to start a new habit of putting on his antiperspirant at night, right at bedtime.
MAKERS of Sure antiperspirant have turned their product on its head.
Recent research has linked breast cancer with the use of aluminium-based, underarm antiperspirants.
Evidence is mounting that an aluminium-based compound found in common antiperspirant agents can break through the skin and potentially cause breast cancer.
Like many other sufferers she was aware that doctors thought antiperspirants may be linked to the condition but until now she was not sure enough of a link to change her behaviour.
EVIDENCE emerged today in the controversial deba te over whether antiperspirants and deodorants are linked to soaring levels of breast cancer in the UK.