antiparticle

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antiparticle

 [an″tĭ-pahr´tĭ-k'l]
either of a pair of elementary particles that have electric charges and magnetic moments of opposite sign and are the same in all other properties, such as mass, lifetime, and spin, e.g., the electron and positron. Every particle has an antiparticle. When antiparticles collide, they are annihilated, and their mass is converted to energy in the form of gamma rays.
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As the universe cooled, the particles and antiparticles annihilated each other in equal numbers, and only a tiny number of particles remained; this tiny amount is all the stars and planets, and gas in today's universe, said Kusenko, who is also a senior scientist with the Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe.
Language strains and buckles, contradicts itself and shatters amid a melee of particles, waves, and fields, all of which may have their antiparticles and their virtual waves and their boundless tremors.
Antiparticles, which have the same mass as particles but are opposite in other respects, such as electric charge and spin direction, are believed to have existed in the same quantity as particles during the Big Bang.
Physicists say that if a special kind of radioactive decay called "neutrinoless double-beta decay" is observed, it would prove two things - one, that in certain circumstances more matter is in fact created than antimatter; and two, neutrinos (which are virtually massless particles produced during radioactive decay) can behave as their own antiparticles.
If the universe had behaved symmetrically as it developed, every particle would have been annihilated by one of its antiparticles.
A]A, this leads to reduce the currents (charges) of particles and antiparticles.
A blip of electric current at the end of an atom-thick wire has brought physicists one step closer to confirming the existence of Majorana particles, entities that are their own antiparticles.
While antiparticles can be created and then detected with costly and complex particle-accelerator experiments, such particles are otherwise very difficult to study.
Antimatter is, in some sense, a mirror image of matter, in the sense that antiparticles have the same or exact opposite characteristic of particles.
But some of the most popular theories in physics suggest dark matter consists of particles that can act as their own antiparticles (S&T: April 2009, page 22).
He uses everyday examples and common sense to explain absolute value to antiparticles to associative property to binary systems and on to common denominators, division, fractions, graphing, irrational numbers, number lines, parallelograms, sampling, and variables.
To date, antiparticles have been found experimentally for all the particles known to physics.