antiparticle

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antiparticle

 [an″tĭ-pahr´tĭ-k'l]
either of a pair of elementary particles that have electric charges and magnetic moments of opposite sign and are the same in all other properties, such as mass, lifetime, and spin, e.g., the electron and positron. Every particle has an antiparticle. When antiparticles collide, they are annihilated, and their mass is converted to energy in the form of gamma rays.
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A note here is in order about the meaning of conventional model: in what follows, we will use this expression for a model based on the simplest version of (10), taking a single class of sources (SNRs) at work, with antiparticles produced only as secondary products from primary spallation, and featuring constant and homogeneous diffusion, tuned on local CR data.
It is clear that a transformation of this type simply interchanges particles with antiparticles and therefore has no physical meaning, since that distinction is conventional to begin with.
Language strains and buckles, contradicts itself and shatters amid a melee of particles, waves, and fields, all of which may have their antiparticles and their virtual waves and their boundless tremors.
Life is universal like elementary particles--protons, neutrons, and electrons or in some places antiparticles of the matter.
A Japanese-led team of international researchers said Monday it has discovered more evidence suggesting that particles and antiparticles may not be completely symmetrical, which could explain why antiparticles vanished at an early stage in the history of the universe.
The trouble is that K-mesons are unstable, and die within less than a millionth of a second, leaving a trail of other particles or antiparticles. Even more elusively, that much sought-after asymmetry occurred just once in every 10 million times in K-mesons.
Thus, for instance, positrons and antiprotons are the antiparticles of electrons and protons, respectively.
After most of these particles and antiparticles killed each other off, there was just enough matter left to make a universe.
These ratios are in good agreement with the relative abundance of particles and antiparticles given in [3, 4].
Physicists say that if a special kind of radioactive decay called "neutrinoless double-beta decay" is observed, it would prove two things - one, that in certain circumstances more matter is in fact created than antimatter; and two, neutrinos (which are virtually massless particles produced during radioactive decay) can behave as their own antiparticles.
In general, for any particle A and its antiparticle [bar.A], in pertubation interaction, they pair and have a scalar particle [bar.A]A, this leads to reduce the currents (charges) of particles and antiparticles.