antiparasitic

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Related to Antiparasitics: Antivirals

antiparasitic

 [an″te-, an″ti-par″ah-sit´ik]
1. destroying parasites.
2. an agent that destroys parasites.

an·ti·par·a·sit·ic

(an'tē-par-ă-sit'ik),
Destructive to parasites.

antiparasitic

(ăn′tē-păr′ə-sĭt′ĭk, ăn′tī-)
adj.
Destroying or inhibiting the growth and reproduction of human or animal parasites.
n.
An antiparasitic drug.

an·ti·par·a·sit·ic

(an'tē-par-ă-sit'ik)
Destructive to parasites.

an·ti·par·a·sit·ic

(an'tē-par-ă-sit'ik)
Destructive to parasites.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another antiparasitic drug, benznidazole, was approved to treat children aged 2-12 years with Chagas disease in 2017, Dr.
The import barriers negative impact on some categories is offset to some degree by those not affected by price controls, such as antiparasitics and nappy/rash treatments.
Subsequent sections list antibiotics, antifungals, antiparasitics, and antivirals, with information on drug use, availability, contraindications, dose, dose adjustments, administration, storage, stability, side effects, potential interactions, pharmacokinetics, and use in pregnancy and lactation.
The use of antibiotics, antiparasitics and symptomatic treatments are best discussed with your vet so that it can be discerned which if any of these are required as specific treatments.
This should ensure demand for certain types of antiparasitics. However, on the other hand, growing resistance to antiparasitics works in the opposite direction by increasing sales, in both cases, of technical instruments, such as lice combs, and often in combination with lifestyle and behavioural changes which are used to combat the epidemics in place of medical substances.
[USPRwire, Thu Apr 30 2015] Recent years have seen an increase in the severity and scope of parasites, lice in particular, among school children, and therefore a corresponding increase in sales of products of antiparasitic nature has been observed.
Feeds containing medically active ingredients, such as antibiocic and antiparasitic drugs or insecticides, that are fed on a "free-choice" basis, are designated free-choice medicated feeds (FCMF) by the U.S.
2009), and considerable fractions of some antiparasitic medications (Lumaret and Errouissi 2002; Wall and Strong 1987), are not absorbed by animals and are eliminated in waste.