antiemetic

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antiemetic

 [an″te-e-met´ik]
1. useful in the treatment of vomiting.
2. an agent that relieves vomiting.

an·ti·e·met·ic

(an'tē-ĕ-met'ik),
1. Preventing or arresting vomiting.
2. A remedy that tends to control nausea and vomiting.
[anti- + G. emetikos, emetic]

antiemetic

/an·ti·emet·ic/ (-ĕ-met´ik) preventing or alleviating nausea and vomiting; also, an agent that so acts.

antiemetic

[-imet′ik]
Etymology: Gk, anti + emesis, vomiting
1 pertaining to a substance or procedure that prevents or alleviates nausea and vomiting.
2 an antiemetic drug or agent. ChlorproMAZINE and other phenothiazines are sometimes effective antiemetic agents. In kinesia, scopolamine and antihistamines provide relief. SHT3-receptor antagonists such as dolasetron and the corticosteroid dexamethasone may relieve chemotherapy-induced nausea. Cannabis derivatives such as dronabinol may also alleviate nausea induced by certain antineoplastic drugs in cancer patients.

antiemetic

adjective Countering emesis, vomiting noun An agent–eg, odansetron, granisetron, which prevents or alleviates nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapeutics–eg, cisplatin, cyclophosphamide, dacarbazine, etc

an·ti·e·met·ic

(an'tē-ĕ-met'ik)
1. Preventing or arresting vomiting.
2. A remedy that tends to control nausea and vomiting.
[anti- + G. emetikos, emetic]

Antiemetic

A preparation or medication that relieves nausea and vomiting. Coke syrup, ginger, and motion sickness medications are examples of antiemetics.

antiemetic (anˈ·tē·e·meˑ·tik),

n a substance that can prevent or lessen the feeling of nausea and vomiting.

an·ti·e·met·ic

(an'tē-ĕ-met'ik)
1. Preventing or arresting vomiting.
2. A remedy that tends to control nausea and vomiting.
[anti- + G. emetikos, emetic]

antiemetic (an´tēəmet´ik, an´tī-əmet´ik),

n drug used to prevent, stop, or relieve nausea and emesis (vomiting).

antiemetic

1. useful in the treatment of vomiting.
2. an agent that relieves vomiting.
References in periodicals archive ?
Brain Structure Regulates THC Effect on User Amygdala emotions, fear, anxiety panic/paranoia Basal Ganglia planning/starting a movement slowed reaction time Brain Stem information between brain antinausea effects and spinal column Cerebellum motor coordination, balance impaired coordination Hippocampus learning new information impaired memory Hypothalamus eating, sexual behavior increased appetite Neocortex complex thinking, feeling, altered thinking, and movement judgment, and sensation Nucleus motivation and reward euphoria Accumbens (feeling good) Spinal Cord transmission of information altered pain between body and brain sensitivity The brain structures illustrated above all contain high numbers of CB receptors
Originally prescribed as an antinausea agent in the 1960s, the developmental toxicity of the drug was discovered after thousands of tragic cases of skeletal appendicular malformations, microphthalmia, and fetal loss occurred in humans (Mellin and Katzenstein 1962).
The physician prescribed pain and antinausea medications and told the patient to follow up with her regular primary care physician.
The drugs, manufactured in Puerto Rico between 2001 and 2005, included the antinausea drug Kytril, the antidepressant Paxil CR, the diabetes medication Avandamet, and the anti-infection ointment Bactroban.
compelled to intervene and provide, for example, antinausea medication, so that the patient's dying would be free of further complications.
Another option involved no active management of cancer but symptom management for the consequences of the cancer; for example, using antinausea medication for nausea and vomiting or removing fluid from the abdomen periodically for ascites.
They are invaluable instruments as they can continuously administer, among other things, pain killers and antinausea medications to critically ill people.
Consider the possibility of discovering pockets of unexpected, high-cost members who are driven by off-label prescribing, such as antinausea medication intended for chemotherapy patients prescribed to members suffering from morning sickness.
Some participants reported receiving treatment for their withdrawal symptoms, including the administration of muscle relaxants, narcotic pain relievers, sedatives, antinausea medications, or Clonidine.
Wyeth could have "unilaterally added a stronger warning" regarding the intravenous-push administration method to its antinausea drug Phenergan, which ultimately caused Diana Levine, a musician, to lose her arm to infection and subsequent amputation, Stevens wrote.