antimuscarinic

antimuscarinic

 [an″te-, an″ti-mus″kah-rin´ik]
1. effective against the toxic effects of muscarine.
2. blocking the muscarinic receptors.
3. an agent that counteracts the effects of muscarine or blocks the muscarinic receptors.

an·ti·mus·ca·rin·ic

(an'tē-mŭs'kă-rin'ik),
Inhibiting or preventing the actions of muscarine and muscarinelike agents, or the effects of parasympathetic stimulation at the neuroeffector junction (for example, atropine).

antimuscarinic

/an·ti·mus·ca·rin·ic/ (an″te-) (an″ti-mus´kah-rin´ik)
1. effective against the toxic effects of muscarine.
2. blocking the muscarinic receptors.
3. an agent having either such action.

antimuscarinic

[-mus′kərin′ik]
Etymology: Gk, anti + L, musca, fly
effective against the poisonous activity of muscarine. Compare muscarinic.
References in periodicals archive ?
2] agonists (LABAs) or long-acting antimuscarinic antagonists (LAMAs) was associated with a 1.
2] agonists or long-acting antimuscarinic antagonists was associated with a 1.
Anticholinergic, antimuscarinic drugs relax the bladder muscle and reduce bladder spasms (oxybutynin).
Anticholinergic drugs with antimuscarinic effects, such as oxybutynin, may be used to treat symptoms of urge incontinence and overactive bladder.
Also, recent large observational studies provide some evidence that concomitant long-term use of inhaled antimuscarinic agents or beta agonists along with cardioselective beta blockers actually reduces mortality rates and the risk of exacerbations in patients with COPD (54,55).
should be measured prior to starting antimuscarinic treatment.
240 ([chi square]) IQR = interquartile range; SABA = short-acting beta-agonist; SAMA = short-acting antimuscarinic agent; LABA = long-acting beta-agonist; ICS = inhaled corticosteroid; K-W = Kruskal-Wallis test; [chi square] = [chi square] test; Fisher = Fisher's exact test.
Antimuscarinic and noncompetitive antagonist properties of dicyclomine hydrochloride in isolated human and rabbit bladder muscle.
Antimuscarinic agents dilate the pupil (mydriasis) and paralyse the ciliary muscle (cycloplegia), relieving pain for the patient.
Anticholinergic or antimuscarinic drugs work by blocking the effects of a chemical called acetylcholine, which the nervous system uses to activate the sweat glands.
When prescribing, consider the possibility of combined side effects with clozapine and adjunct medications having antimuscarinic or alpha-adrenergic activity, or both.
As an antimuscarinic agent, darifenacin alone effectively reduced carbachol's stimulation, but showed very weak inhibition (no more than 40%) on lowering EFS responses.