antimicrobial

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Related to Antimicrobials: Antimicrobial agents

an·ti·mi·cro·bi·al

(an'tē-mī-krō'bē-ăl),
Tending to destroy microbes, to prevent their multiplication or growth, or to prevent their pathogenic action.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

antimicrobial

(ăn′tē-mī-krō′bē-əl, ăn′tī-) also

antimicrobic

(-bĭk)
adj.
Capable of destroying or inhibiting the growth of microorganisms: antimicrobial drugs.

an′ti·mi·cro′bial n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

antimicrobial

adjective Referring to an agent or mechanism that kills or inhibits the growth or reproduction of microbes.
 
noun An agent that attenuates, kills or inhibits the growth or reproduction of microbes.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

antimicrobial

adjective Referring to an agent or mechanism that kills or inhibits the growth or reproduction of microbes noun An agent that attenuates, kills or inhibits the growth or reproduction of microbes
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

an·ti·mi·cro·bi·al

(an'tē-mī-krō'bē-ăl)
Tending to destroy microbes, to prevent their multiplication or growth, or to prevent their pathogenic action.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

antimicrobial

Able to destroy microorganisms.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Antimicrobial

A plant substance that acts to inhibit the growth of harmful microorganisms, or acts to destroy them.
Mentioned in: Echinacea
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

an·ti·mi·cro·bi·al

(an'tē-mī-krō'bē-ăl)
Tending to destroy microbes, to prevent their multiplication or growth, or to prevent their pathogenic action.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
THE Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) of the United Nations has said it would deploy its expertise in countries to mitigate the effect of antimicrobial resistance in food and agriculture.
Why should sanitarians, environmental health specialist, and other professionals working in the environmental health field be concerned about antimicrobial resistance?
In a new report, researchers are calling for a collaborative and global approach to addressing antimicrobial resistance in the environment.
In addition, 123 countries reported that they have policies to regulate the sale of antimicrobials, including the requirement of a prescription for human use, a key measure to tackle overuse and misuse of antimicrobials.
However, two potential problems may result from directly incorporating antimicrobial agents into a polymer matrix.
Of this one part was taken for thaw and freeze treatment, while the second for ultrasonication treatment, before conducting antimicrobial activities.
"A lack of transparency about which products include antimicrobials and for what purpose makes it very difficult to implement a list-based approach based on specific chemicals," Perkins+Will explains.
Increased use of antimicrobials in construction products, however, has resulted in increased scrutiny of the inherent safety of the antimicrobials.
Hemodialysis patients are at high risk for infections (including those caused by multi-drug resistant organisms), because of frequent healthcare access and increased use of antimicrobials. Thus, optimizing antimicrobial prescribing would have a substantial impact on their care.
Countries reaffirmed their commitment to develop national action plans on AMR, based on the "Global Action Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance"--the blueprint for tackling AMR developed in 2015 by WHO in coordination with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE).
The emergence of antimicrobial resistance can render the first line antimicrobials to be ineffective, leading to the use of second or third line agents which may be more toxic and costly.5 In Malaysia, a significant 16% of increment in annual antimicrobial consumption was reported from 2009 to 2010.5