anthelmintic

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Related to Antihelminthics: Anthelmintics

anthelmintic

 [ant″hel-min´tik]
1. destructive to parasitic worms; called also antihelmintic and vermifugal.
2. an agent destructive to worms; examples include piperazine and hexylresorcinol for the roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides;quinacrine for tapeworms; oxytetracycline and emetine for protozoan infections such as amebic dysentery; and mebendazole for several different intestinal worms. Many anthelmintic drugs are toxic and should be given with care; the toxic effects of a specific drug should be known prior to administration and the patient observed carefully for such effects after the drug is given. Called also vermicide, and vermifuge
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ant·hel·min·tic

(ant'hel-min'tik, an-thel-),
1. An agent that destroys or expels intestinal worms. Synonym(s): anthelminthic, antihelminthic, helminthagogue, helminthic (2) , helmintic (2) , vermifuge
2. Having the power to destroy or expel intestinal worms. Synonym(s): vermifugal
[anti- + G. helmins, worm]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

anthelmintic

(ănt′hĕl-mĭn′tĭk, ăn′thĕl-) also

anthelminthic

(-thĭk)
adj.
Acting to expel or destroy parasitic intestinal worms.
n.
An agent that destroys or causes the expulsion of parasitic intestinal worms.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ant·hel·min·tic

(ant'hĕl-min'tik)
1. An agent that destroys or expels intestinal worms.
Synonym(s): helminthagogue.
2. Having the power to destroy or expel intestinal worms.
[anti- + G. helmins, worm]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

anthelmintic

A drug used to kill or drive out parasitic worms from the intestines. From the Greek anti , against and elmins , a worm.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Anthelminthic (also spelled anthelmintic)

A type of drug or herbal preparation given to destroy parasitic worms or expel them from the body.
Mentioned in: Dysentery
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Zani LC, Favre TC, Pieri OS, Barbosa CS (2004) Impact of antihelminthic treatment on infection by Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and hookworms in covas, a rural community of Pernanbuco, Brazil.
Patients not undergoing appendectomy can benefit from fecal sampling and night-time application of cellophane tape in the perianal area as a means of detecting the parasite as well as empirical antihelminthic therapy.
Because of the high morbidity and mortality of the antihelminthic medications albendazol (Albenza) and praziquantel (Biltricide), it is uncertain when therapies should be employed.
Patients being treated with antihelminthic medications need to be monitored closely for signs of increased intracranial pressure, because hydrocephalus is a common side effect of the medication.
Both Carpio and colleagues (1995) and Kramer (1995) believe that previous reports of favorable response to treatment of neurocysticercosis with antihelminthic therapy are by no means definitive and may be a reflection of the natural history of the condition.
Praziquantel is an isoquinolone with a broad antihelminthic activity (Sotelo et al., 1990).
The decision of whether or not to give dexamethasone concomitantly with antihelminthic therapy is also somewhat controversial in the literature.
If dexamethasone is used, it affects the serum concentrations of the antihelminthic therapy when albendazole is given concomitantly with dexamethasone, the serum and CSF metabolite concentrations are increased by up to 50% (Jung, Hurtado, Medina, Sanchez, & Sotelo, 1990), whereas the plasma levels of praziquantel decrease 50% when given dexamethasone simultaneously (Vazquez, Jung, & Sotelo, 1987).