antianginal

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Related to Antianginals: antilipemics

antianginal

/an·ti·an·gi·nal/ (-an-ji´nal) preventing or alleviating angina, or an agent that does this.

antianginal

[-anjī′nəl]
1 pertaining to the reduction of myocardial oxygen consumption or the increase of oxygen supply to the myocardium to prevent symptoms of angina pectoris.
2 an antianginal agent.

antianginal

adjective Referring to an agent or mechanism that counters anginal pain noun An agent that prevents or ameliorates anginal pain

antianginal (an·tī·an·jīˑ·nl),

n a drug used to treat angina pectoris, a symptom of ischemic heart disease. Such drugs include beta blockers, Ca++ antagonists, and nitrates that facilitate vasodilation. See also angina pectoris.
References in periodicals archive ?
In those patients, newer antianginal medications can be added, without causing any deleterious hemodynamic compromise as these agents have different mechanisms of action from the traditional agents.
The antianginal drug trimetazidine shifts cardiac energy metabolism from fatty acid oxidation to glucose oxidation by inhibiting mitochondrial long-chain 3-ketoacyl coenzyme A thiolase.
Antianginal efficacy of the combination of trimetazidine-propranolol compared with isosorbide dinitrate-propranolol in patients with stable angina.
9) Aspirin (50), (n=81 (a)) clopidogrel (18), Ticlopidine (18) Antianginal 64 (18.
The study addresses eight separate populations based on medication therapeutic classes within the cardiovascular medication category: antianginals, antihypertensives, antiarrhythmics, antihyperlipidemics, beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, cardiotonics, and diuretics.
By age group, the 75-84 year old group had the largest number of recipients for antianginals, antiarrhythmics, and cardiotonics.
The Northeast region had the least percentage of noncompliance for antianginals and antiarrhythmics.
For disease burden, recipients with the highest disease burden had the highest percentage of noncompliance for antianginals, antihypertensives, antiarrhythmics, beta blockers, calcium blockers, cardiotonics, and diuretics; recipients with the lowest disease burden were the most noncompliant for antihyperlipidemics.
Using the Northeast region as the reference group, we found that elderly recipients residing in any of the remaining United States regions were more likely to be noncompliant with antianginals and antiarrhythmics (throughout the regression analysis section we report results holding all other independent variables constant).